Photoshop CS6: The Missing Manual

Errata for Photoshop CS6: The Missing Manual

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The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed, PDF, Safari Books Online, Other Digital Version
Page xxii
last paragraph

Please change last sentence of last graf to read: ...and to our beautiful kitties, Samantha and Sherlock, who forced me to get out of my pretty purple Aeron chair and play The Laser Pointer Game with them at exactly 5:15 pm each day.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page xx
1st paragraph

1st paragraph, 2nd sentence, please change to read: She's an internationally acclaimed speaker, a stock photographer, and the founder of the creative tutorial site...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Nov 06, 2012  Nov 19, 2012
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Page 3
last bullet point, next to last sentence

Page 3, last bullet point, next to last sentence, please change text inside parens to read: ...(see the Brush Projection checkbox in the Shape Dynamics settings)...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 31
First sentence of Note on the bottom of page 31

First sentence should read: "Deleting Photoshop's preferences file can be a useful troubleshooting technique."

Note from the Author or Editor:
Page 31, first sentence in Note at bottom of page, add space between Photoshop's and preferences

Anonymous  Dec 08, 2012  Mar 14, 2014
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Page 33
Note at bottom of page

Page 33, note at bottom of page, please change 2nd sentence to read: Since the speed at which the disk spins plays a big role in scratch disk performance, stick with solid state disks (SSD) rated at 7200 RPM...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 66
first note in middle of page

Page 66, first note in middle of page, please change to read: You can only pick a 2-up...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 89
bottom paragraph

Period needed before the last sentence on the page. (Should be "...its position. By the way...")

Anonymous  Dec 18, 2012  Mar 14, 2014
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Page 96
Sidebar, 3rd paragraph

Page 96, please replace first three paragraphs of sidebar with the following text: One of the problems with Photoshop’s pattern fills is their lack of randomness. Basically, the program takes an image that’s perfectly square and repeats it in a grid-like pattern, whether the image is built into the program as a preset or one you load using the preset menu (labeled in Figure 3-11, bottom). But a real brick wall, for example, isn’t made from perfectly identical bricks; each brick varies in color, texture, and sometimes size. That’s why Adobe added the ability to apply scripts to pattern fills in CS6. You can access these scripts via the Fill dialog box or when you’re filling a path (page 564). To give scripted patterns a spin, create a new layer and then choose Edit→Fill. In the resulting dialog box, from the Use pop-up menu, choose Pattern and then pick a pattern from the Custom Pattern menu. Next, turn on the Scripted Patterns checkbox at the bottom of the dialog box, and then choose from the five built-in scripts: Brick Fill, Cross Weave, Random Fill, Spiral, and Symmetry Fill. Click OK and Photoshop adds a whole lotta randomness to your pattern, as shown here (Spiral is the only one that doesn’t introduce random color). For example, the Brick Fill script makes Photoshop offset the pattern every second row by half of the pattern’s width, and introduce a variety of colors based on the original pattern’s color (in this case, the gray Sandpaper pattern in the new Erodible Textures category). These scripts become even more useful if you use ’em on a custom pattern you create yourself, such as one made from the leaf and chili images shown here. For step-by-step instructions and ideas on how to use ‘em with your own photography, visit this book’s Missing CD page at www.missingmanuals.com/cds and click the Scripted Patterns link.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 121
item 1.

"... and then choosing Layers" should read "... and then choosing Levels".

Note from the Author or Editor:
Page 121, step 1, bolded sentence, last word: Please change "...and then choosing Layers" to "... and then choosing Levels"

Jack Kelley  Sep 23, 2012  Nov 19, 2012
Printed
Page 142
last paragraph

Moving selection with cursor and a selection tool - only works in New mode.

Note from the Author or Editor:
At the top of page 143 (print), please change the tip to read as follows: When you start drawing a selection, Photoshop activates the “New selection” button at the far left of the Options bar. While in this mode, you can move a selection as you’re drawing it by moving your mouse while pressing the mouse button and the space bar. When you’ve got the selection where you want it, release the space bar—but not your mouse button—and continue drawing the selection.

Jan Klapetzky  Jan 25, 2013 
Printed
Page 143
Figure 4-3; 3rd paragraph

In CS6 you get a handy a handy overlay ... Please remove one instance of "a handy overlay"

Anonymous  May 10, 2013  Mar 14, 2014
Printed
Page 150
top in step 1

in step 1 "...in step 6,..." there is no step 6 only 1-5

Note from the Author or Editor:
In body of step 1, change "step 6" to "step 5"

Randall White  Jul 06, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 169
last paragraph

Page 169, last graf, please change end of sentence page reference to 206

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 183
3rd paragraph

Moving a selected object (the actual pixels) within the same document. You left out (Alt on a PC) copyes the pixels and leves no "hole", I use this all the time in what I do.

Note from the Author or Editor:
Page 183, 2nd bullet point, 2nd sentence, change to read: Press V to activate the Move tool... At the end of the same bullet, please add: To duplicate the selection, in order to move it to another part of the image without leaving a hole, Option-drag (Alt-drag on a PC) the selection instead.

Randall White  Jul 12, 2012  Nov 19, 2012
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Page 246
Note in middle of page

Text inside the note has no spaces. Please fix the formatting so it's not all squished together.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 277
Figure 7-5

The file names in the player.zip file are reversed. Player.jpg should be Baseball.jpg and Baseball.jpg should be Player.jpg.

Note from the Author or Editor:
No changes to be made in the book, but on the Missing CD web page, please reverse the filenames in the .zip file.

Jack Kelley  Oct 01, 2012  Nov 19, 2012
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Page 284
note at bottom of page

Page 284, note at bottom of page, 1st sentence, please change to read: Fifty percent gray is, as you might suspect, the color...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 312
Note near bottom of page

The Note mentions "Color Mixer Adjustment layers"; it should say "Channel Mixer Adjustment layers" instead.

Note from the Author or Editor:
Page 312, note at bottom of page, change "Color Mixer" to "Channel Mixer"

Dawn Mann  May 31, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Other Digital Version
324
Fig 8-10

The image in missing cd chap 8 girl.jpg is a duplicate of chap 8 dress.jpg

Note from the Author or Editor:
New practice file was uploaded to Missing CD page to replace current "girl.jpg" download as it was an inadvertent duplicate of "dress.jpg".

Bob Redd  Jun 22, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 356
sidebar at bottom of page

Page 356, sidebar at bottom of page, please change last sentence of last graf to read: Flip to page 650 for the step-by-step scoop, and see the caption in Figure 15-9 to learn how to fix edge fringe in Camera Raw.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 370
Paragraph headed Vibrance

On page 370 the paragraph states that vibrance has more of an effect on bright colors than on light colors. This is incorrect. Page 403 shows the opposite - that vibrance has less of an effect on intense colours.

Note from the Author or Editor:
On page 370, in the Vibrance bullet, please change text after semi-colon to read: ;it has less effect on highly saturated (intense) colors and won't destroy skin tones.

Noel Martin  Jul 04, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 459
Keeping the Noise Down sidebar, 1st paragraph

Page 459, sidebar, 1st graf, please change to read: When shooting in low-light conditions, you can inadvertently introduce noise—black-and-white or colored speckles—into your images. This is especially true if you've increased your camera's ISO (it's light sensitivity setting). If that happens, be sure to reduce or get rid of the noise before you sharpen the image, or you’ll end up sharpening...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 603
last subhead, first graf, first sentence

page 603, last subhead, 1st graf, 1st sentence, please change to read: Adding extra carriage returns between lines of text to create space or wondering how designers make lines of text appear all squashed together means you've encountered leading...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 606
Last subhead, 1st graf

Page 606, last subhead, 1st graf, 1st sentence, please change to read: The invisible line onto which text sits is called its baseline.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 647
Note at bottom of page

page 647, note at bottom of page, changed to read: To activate the...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 651
Figure 15-9 caption

Page 651, figure 15-9 caption, 2nd paragraph, please change to read: In the Lens Correction panel, click the Color tab and turn on the Remove Chromatic Aberration" checkbox. If necessary, adjust the...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 669
step 4, top of page

page 669, top of page, step 4, the whole step is bolded and it shouldn't be. Please insert a carriage return before "As you learned..." so that the previous text next to the step is bold and the rest is normal. Reduce size of figure 15-19 if necessary to prevent re-pagination.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 732
step 2

page 732, step 2, please insert the arrow symbol between Window and Timeline (currently it's the 'missing symbol' x within a square)

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 09, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed
Page 751
Top

Figure 17-15 mislabeled to read Fifure 17-16

Note from the Author or Editor:
Page 751, please change figure number to be 17-15.

Nick Oray  Jun 30, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
Printed, PDF, ePub
Page 778
last line

It seems that the link of the last tip is not working...

Note from the Author or Editor:
Page 778, botttom of page, please delete the tip in its entirety as the plug-in has been temporarily removed from the market.

Anonymous  Oct 22, 2012  Nov 19, 2012
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Page 788
entire page

Page 788, please replace all text on that page with the following (it should fit but if not, please alert me and I'll edit down): The easiest way to create a new video project is by opening an existing clip. You won’t get the handy guides that you do when you create a blank video project as described in the previous section, but you can always add ’em yourself (page 69 has more on guides). NOTE: Photoshop supports MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, MOV, AVI, and FLV (if Adobe Flash is installed on your computer), along with Image Sequence formats (where each frame of the video is saved as an individual file) such as BMP, DICOM, JPEG, OpenEXR, PNG, PSD, TARGA, TIFF, Cineon, JPEG 2000, and more. Whew! To open a video clip(s) as a new document, choose File→Open, navigate to where the clip(s) live on your hard drive and click Open. Photoshop creates a new document whose size matches the size of the frames in the video, it opens the Timeline panel (Figure 20-2, top) and plops the clip into a video track. Photoshop also creates a group in the Layers panel (named Video Group 1) and places the clip inside the group on its own Video layer (Figure 20-2, bottom). To add another clip, click the tiny filmstrip icon next to the track name in the Timeline panel and choose Add Media. In the resulting Add Clips dialog box, navigate to where the clip(s) live (Shift or @cmd/Ctrl click to choose more than one file) and click Open. You can also click the + sign to the right of the video track to do the same thing. Either way, the new clip(s) appear to the right of the first clip and in the Layers panel as a new layer at the top of the currently active video group. Clips in a single track play one after another. To add a clip to a new document—say, a new video document (page 799)—choose Layer→Video Layers→“New Video Layer from File” and in the resulting Add Video Layer dialog box, locate a clip and click OK (you can’t add multiple clips with this method). Photoshop imports the clip as a Video layer and places it on a video track named Layer 1. (You can also click the Create Video Timeline button in the Timeline panel to do the same thing, though you only see that button if you’ve not yet created any Video layers.) To add more clips, use the methods described in the paragraph above and Photoshop adds ‘em to the track and plops the clips into a new group in your Layers panel. You can also use Bridge or Mini Bridge to open or add clips to your project (see Chapter 21). WARNING: Photoshop never embeds video into your document. Instead, it links to the original video file, keeping your Photoshop document’s file size manageable and leaving the original video file untouched; if you move the video file on your hard drive you’ll break the link. This allows you to perform nondestructive editing—Photoshop applies your edits to a copy of the original clip when you export your project (page 815). Keeping your video clips in one track (and thus, a video group in your Layers panel) is handy for organizing your project. For example, you could use one video track for clips that you want to play in succession and another track for text (page 798). If you want one clip to play at the same time as another (say, for a special effect), add another video track by clicking the filmstrip icon next to the track’s name in the Timeline panel and choosing New Video Group.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 788
3rd paragraph of revised text from earlier errata

REVISED FROM EARLIER SUBMISSION: 3rd paragraph of new text from earlier errata, please change to read (changed page ref from page 799 to page 786): To add a clip to a new document—say, a new video document (page 786)—choose Layer...

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 789
bottom of page, last paragraph

Page 789, last graf at bottom of page, please change to read: If you’re working with multiple Video layers (whether they’re in a video group or not), be sure to give each one a meaningful name. This helps you keep ’em straight in your head and prepares the document for additional tweaking in a professional video-editing program, which may get confused by duplicate layer names (say, if you import the same video clip twice instead of just duplicating the Video layer in Photoshop).

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 790
first three paragraphs

page 790, subhead 1, change body text of that section to read: Once you’ve added some video clips to your document, you might want to turn them into Smart Objects. When you do, the clips are primed and ready for applying filters nondestructively. In fact, using Smart Objects is the only way to apply a filter to a whole video clip (otherwise Photoshop only applies the filter to a single frame; you’ll learn more about that on page 814). Using Smart Objects is also handy if you want the clip to be smaller onscreen than other clips (for a picture-in-picture effect). While it seems logical that you could import a video clip as a Smart Object by choosing File→Place… you can’t. Sure, doing so adds the clip to your document as a Smart Object (page 126), but Photoshop treats the clip as a still image instead of a video. The only way to turn a Video layer into a Smart Object is to add the clip using the techniques described on page 788 and then Ctrl-click (right-click on a PC) near the layer’s name in the Layers panel and choose “Convert to Smart Object” (you can also activate the layer and then choose Filter→“Convert for Smart Filters”).

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 790
2nd subhead, 1st paragraph

page 790, 2nd subhead, please change 1st graf to read: The Timeline panel is mission control for your project (Figure 20-2, top). It appears at the bottom of your workspace when you create a new video document or open an existing clip (page 788). It lets you play, rewind, or fast forward through your project, trim or split clips, skip to a specific spot within a clip, apply motion to stills and text, and more. Before diving into all that, here’s an overview of the basics of using the Timeline panel.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 791
various spots

page 791, please change 1st note to read: Even new machines can struggle with video playback, especially if the clips are high definition. If the frame rate turns red during playback, you aren’t seeing all the frames (Photoshop shows how many you are seeing, instead of the intended frame rate). You’ll also spot a row of tiny cyan dots beneath the Time ruler (visible in Figure 20-2). change 2nd note to read: In the Layers panel, layers that are lower in the stack within a video group appear earlier in that video track, and layers that are higher in the stack appear later. (In other words, the bottom-to-top order of Video layers in the Layers panel is the same as the left-to-right order of video clips in a video track.) So dragging a Video layer down or up in the Layers panel also moves the clip left or right in the video track, respectively. change last graf to read: Fortunately, Photoshop makes it easy to trim a clip—just drag its endpoints left or rightward in the Timeline panel. As you shorten one clip in a video track, the others slide over to keep the track seamless, as shown in Figure 20-3. change caption of figure 20-3 to read: Point your cursor at the start or end point of a clip and it turns into a bracket with a double-sided arrow (circled). The direction of the bracket indicates which clip will be affected. Click and drag the bracket left or right and Photoshop opens a preview window that shows exactly which frame you’re trimming the video down to. Handy, eh?

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 792
1st note

page 792, change 1st note to read: If a Video layer has been converted into a Smart Object (page 790), or if you used File→Place to import a still as a Smart Object, clicking the triangle in the clip’s top right opens the Motion panel instead (it includes presets such as Pan, Zoom, Rotate, etc.). You can use this panel to add Ken Burns-style motion to your still images in order to produce a pro-level slideshow. This panel is discussed on pages 804-805.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 798
1st tip

page 798, please change 1st tip to read: Once you’ve added text, you can animate it in a variety of ways; some easier than others. For example, you can flip ahead to page 804 to learn how to add motion using Text Warp (slightly complicated) as well as how to pan and zoom text using the Motion panel (super easy).

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 800
last paragraph on page

page 800, please change last graf on page to read: To create a more complex and layered audio effect in which audio clips overlap each other, you can add additional Audio Tracks and place audio clips in them. This is a great way to add sound effects to your project. To do so, click the musical-note icon circled in Figure 20-9 (top) and then, from the resulting pop-up menu, choose New Audio Track. Position your playhead at the point in which you want the sound effect to occur—say, when your superhero descends from the sky and lands on the ground—then drag the audio clip to the Playhead and it snaps into place. If you’re searching for such a sound effect, try the keywords “cinematic hit.”

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 804
last paragraph

page 804, please change last graf to read: You can also animate text, and still images for that matter, by using the five Ken Burns-style presets available in the Motion panel; to open it, click the little triangle at the far right of the text clip in the Timeline panel, or Ctrl-click (right-click) the text clip itself. The presets in the Motion panel are a great way to quickly get your text or images moving, as they animate ‘em for you, beginning at the start point of the text or image clip and ending when the text or image clip does. Each preset offers different controls that you can tweak (they all include a “Resize to Fill Canvas” checkbox, which fills your frame with the text, regardless of its original size). Here’s what each setting does:

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 805
figure 20-12 caption

page 805, please change caption of figure 20-12 to read: Top: The Motion panel’s presets make it easy to create basic text or still image animations. Click the triangle circled here to open the panel. Bottom: Here you can see each Ken Burns-style preset and their various settings. For a pro-level slideshow of your own photography, try importing a slew of still images into a single video track using File→Place. Once they appear in a track in your Timeline, you can use the little triangle at the top right of each image clip (circled here at top) to add motion to each one for a very custom effect. Sweet!

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 810
last 3 paragraphs

page 810, please change last 3 grafs on page, beneath "Adding fill and Adjustment Layers" to read: Just like still images, video clips often look better after you adjust their color and contrast or apply a creative color effect to ‘em (think black and white or sepia), all of which is easily done with an Adjustment layer. There will also be times when you want your video to begin or end with a fade in or out to a solid color (say, black), which is the perfect use for a Fill layer. Happily, you can add Fill or Adjustment layers to a video project exactly the same way you add ‘em to any other Photoshop document—just activate the layer in the Layers panel that you want the Adjustment or Fill layer to appear above, and then click the half-black/half-white circle icon at the bottom of the panel. From the resulting menu, choose the kind of Fill or Adjustment layer you want to add, and then adjust the settings that appear in the Properties panel. For example, to start your video with solid black, you can add a black Fill layer to the bottom of your video group in your Layers panel (or drag it to the beginning of the video track in the Timeline panel). To add solid black at the end of your video, duplicate the Fill layer and drag it to the top of the video group or end of the track. (For more on Fill and Adjustment layers, see page 77.) When you add an Adjustment layer, Photoshop automatically clips it to the active Video layer, so you don’t have to worry about it affecting other Video layers (Fill layers don’t get clipped to the active Video layer). If you want the Adjustment layer to affect all the Video layers underneath it, click the “Clip to layer” icon at the bottom of the Properties panel (it’s circled in Figure 20-17). However, unlike still images, the lighting in a video clip often changes over time. Fortunately, the Timeline panel also lets you control the duration of Adjustment layers applied to video clips (you’ll learn how in a moment).

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 811
figure 20-17 caption

page 811, please change figure 20-17 caption to read: Top: The down-pointing arrow above the Video layer thumbnail indicates that the Adjustment layer is clipped (attached to) the Video layer beneath it, so it affects just the one clip. Fill layers are different and are visible across the whole video frame, so they can’t be clipped to any layers. Fill layers are super useful for fading your video to solid color either between clips (say, to make text readable) or to create a fade-in/fade-out effect at the beginning or end of your project. Bottom: The “Clip to layer” icon at the bottom of the Properties panel controls whether the Adjustment layer affects all the layers below it, or only one. Just give it a click to reverse its behavior.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 814-815
last graf on 814 & first graf on 815

page 814-815, please change last graf on page 814 to read as follows (it spills over onto page 815): The good news is that you can run Photoshop’s filters on video clips. The bad news is that if you run a filter on a regular Video layer, it only affects the current frame of that video. To make the filter affect all the frames in the clip, convert the clip to a Smart Object first by activating the Video layer in the Layers panel and then choosing Filter→“Convert for Smart Filters;” then run the filter (as you learned on page 790, you can’t use File→Place to import video as a Smart Object because Photoshop turns it into a still instead). Alas, you can’t adjust the duration of the Smart Filter—it affects the entire Video layer. (For more on Smart Objects, flip back to page 126.)

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012
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Page 818
last section on page

page 818, please add following bullet point above the others at the bottom of page: www.PhotoLesa.com. Your author is continually pushing the bounds of video editing inside of Photoshop and frequently publishes tutorials for your reading pleasure. A fun example of solid black fades, multiple clips, transitions, audio, as well as animated text and stills lives at lesa.in/pscs6videofun.

Lesa Snider
Lesa Snider
O'Reilly Author 
Jul 10, 2012  Jul 13, 2012