Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 Inside Out: Mailbox and High Availability

Errata for Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 Inside Out: Mailbox and High Availability




The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed, PDF
Page 51, 58, 62, 63
twice on 51 and 58 once on 62 and 63

Setup.com is referenced six times in chapter 2. In each, it needs to be replaced with Setup.exe.

Tony Redmond  Nov 05, 2013 
Printed
Page 109
Inside Out sidebar: Too many objects

The number of objects returned by EMS is 10,000 not 1,000. The text for the sidebar should be as shown below: By default, EMS returns up to 10,000 objects in response to cmdlets. (The value in Exchange 2007 is 5,000.) Therefore, if you run a cmdlet such as Get-Mailbox, Exchange will return up to 10,000 mailboxes if they are available. If you work in a small Exchange organization that supports fewer than 10,000 mailboxes, you don’t need to worry too much about the number of objects you have to deal with because PowerShell will likely return relatively few objects, and things usually progress quickly. However, it’s a different situation in large organizations, where you have to pay attention to the filters you specify to retrieve data or override the default limit for returned objects by specifying the ResultSize parameter for cmdlets. For example, to let EMS return as many mailboxes as it can find, you could use a command like this: Get-Mailbox –ResultSize Unlimited This command will work, but it will be very slow because EMS has to read every single mailbox in the organization. Think about how long this might take to execute in an organization that supports more than 300,000 mailboxes. In these situations it’s always better to specify a filter to restrict the number of objects EMS looks for and returns.

Tony Redmond
Tony Redmond
O'Reilly Author 
Oct 01, 2013 
PDF
Page 215
After figure 5-16

Mailboxes that use the quotas inherited from the database settings have their UseDatabaseQuotaDefaults property set to $False, whereas those that have individual quota settings have the property set to $True. Should state opposite $true then $false

Note from the Author or Editor:
Absolutely correct. This will be fixed in the next reprint.

Anonymous  Jan 23, 2014 
Printed
Page 485
First para under bulleted list

The paragraph should read: Transaction logs are not copied to servers that host database copies when block mode replication is in use because the passive servers are already building and replaying their own copy of logs. However, as soon as the Replication service determines that block mode is not appropriate (for instance, the replay queue has begun to grow), it reverts to file mode replication and starts to copy transaction logs again. The advantage of block mode is that transactions are dispatched immediately when they are available to the log buffer of the active database. Transaction data arrive to the servers that hold passive databases as quickly as the server hosting the active database can dispatch data across the network.

Tony Redmond
Tony Redmond
O'Reilly Author 
Oct 01, 2013 
Printed
Page 658
Bottom paragraph

You cannot define a retention tag to the Contacts folder. It should ve removed from the list in this sentence: such as the Calendar, Contacts, and Tasks

Tony Redmond
Tony Redmond
O'Reilly Author 
Oct 01, 2013 
Printed
Page 659
First complete para

There’s no point including the Sync Issues folder in the set of folders that you worry about in a retention policy because synchronization logs stay on the PC and never appear on the server, so MFA can’t process them! From an editing perspective we need to remove all references to the Sync Issues folder in the discussion (please revert to author for exact changes in text). Consequently, we also need to remove the reference to Sync Issues from Table 11-3 on page 664 and the reference to the tag called “Sync Issues 1″ from the code on page 674 as well as the reference to the Sync Issues folder on page 675. Call this issue some brain-dead thinking on my part…

Tony Redmond
Tony Redmond
O'Reilly Author 
Oct 01, 2013 
Printed
Page 661
First Inside Out sidebar

Text should read: INSIDE OUT Some items are timeless Items in some folders tend to be more timeless than general-purpose messages, so you should think carefully through the potential consequences when you create retention policy tags for folders. For example, people usually want to keep important project documents for a long time, so it might be best to create tags that enable users to mark these items not to expire. To do this, they should create a personal tag with a Never retention period, which indicates to Exchange that the item should be held indefinitely and neither deleted nor archived by MFA.

Tony Redmond
Tony Redmond
O'Reilly Author 
Oct 01, 2013 
Printed
Page 770
Inside Out sidebar

There are formatting problems in the sample code and I now know that the sample code could be improved. The complete sidebar should read: INSIDE OUT Knowing which public folder mailbox holds the writeable hierarchy As you can see from Figure 12-2, many public folder mailboxes can be active in an organization, but only one holds the writeable copy of the public folder hierarchy. EAC shows you which public folder mailbox contains the primary hierarchy, but you can also find out and discover how EAC knows which mailbox holds the writeable copy of the public folder hierarchy by issuing this command: Get-OrganizationConfig | Select RootPublicFolderMailbox However, this command only returns the globally unique identifier (GUID) of the public folder mailbox, which is not really useful to a human. The better approach is to run this command: Get-Mailbox -PublicFolder | Where {$_.IsRootPublicFolderMailbox –eq $True} | Select Name, ExchangeGuid This returns a list of all public folder mailboxes and then applies a filter to extract the mailbox that contains the writable hierarchy.

Tony Redmond
Tony Redmond
O'Reilly Author 
Oct 01, 2013