iMovie 2: The Missing Manual

Errata for iMovie 2: The Missing Manual

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page back cover

The third bullet used to read: "...email to friends, or even burn as a Video CD." It now reads: "...email to friends, or even burn as a DVD disk (using Apple's iDVD software)."

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page vi, vii
The chapter numbers were off by one in the first printing, thanks to

the incorrect repetition of the "Building the Movie" chapter name. This line should be deleted, and the remaining chapters renumbered (i.e., Chapter 6: Transitions and Effects ... Chapter 15: Final Cut, Premiere, and EditDV).

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page vii
Inserted this table of contents entry in Chapter 12

Burning a DVD with iDVD.......298

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page Appendix A
355 (Update)

The text used to read: The next time you open iMovie by double-clicking its icon, the program will reopen whatever project document you were working on. It now reads: The next time you open iMovie by double-clicking its icon, the program will reopen whatever project document you were working on. (In Mac OS X, the Quit iMovie command is in the iMovie menu instead.)

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2002
Printed
Page Appendix A
358 (Update)

The text used to read: This command brings up the Preferences dialog box, as shown in Figure A-1. Here youÕre offered a smattering of useful options, arranged on several tabs: It now reads: This command brings up the Preferences dialog box, as shown in Figure A-1. (In Mac OS X, this command is in the iMovie menu instead of File.) Here youÕre offered a smattering of useful options, arranged on several tabs:

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2002
Printed
Page Appendix A
359 (Update) [the page flow has shifted to accommodate new text on page 358]

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2002
Printed
Page index
399 (Typo or formatting problem)

The text used to read: superimposing titles, 193 It now reads: superimposing titles, 183

Anonymous    Mar 01, 2002
Printed
Page 21

The text used to read: only one hour of recording per tape It now reads: only one hour of recording per standard tape

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 27

The text used to read: Some Sony camcorders offer a night-vision mode (called NightShot) that works like night-vision goggles. In this mode, you can actually Þlm (and see, as you watch the LCD screen) in total darkness. The infrared transmitter on the front of the camcorder measures the heat given off by various objects in its path, letting you capture an eerie, greenish night scene. It now reads: Some Sony camcorders offer a night-vision mode (called NightShot) that produces results that resemble what you'd see through night-vision goggles. In this mode, you can actually Þlm (and see, as you watch the LCD screen) in total darkness. The camcorder's CCDs (light sensors) can actually pick up reflections from the infrared transmitter on the front of the camcorder, letting you capture an eerie, greenish night scene.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 31

The text used to read: As a bonus, these camcorders can also play back your old 8 mm and Hi-8 cassettes, making these cameras great transitional models. It now reads: As a bonus, most of these camcorders (but not the TRV130) can also play back your old 8 mm and Hi-8 cassettes, making these cameras great transitional models.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 90

The text used to read: running Mac OS 9.0.4 or later. It now reads: running Mac OS 9.0.4 or later (there's even a Mac OS X version of iMovie).

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 90

The text used to read: for $50 It now reads: for $50 (or free, if you have Mac OS X).

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 91

The first paragraph under "Updating Your Copy of iMovie" used to read: Like any software company, Apple occasionally releases new versions of iMovie. For example, iMovie 2.0.1 was an important update that appeared almost immediately after the original 2.0 version. Each upgrade adds extremely desirable new features to the program as well as better reliability. It now reads: Like any software company, Apple occasionally releases new versions of iMovie. Version 2.0.1 was an important bug-fix update that appeared almost immediately after the original 2.0 version; the 2.0.3 version added compatibility with iDVD (see page 299) and even more bug fixes.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 101

The text used to read: it's available from missingmanual.com and macdiskexplorer.com. It now reads: it's available from missingmanual.com and diskexplorer.com.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 106

[The 2nd paragraph has been cut, and this paragraph has been added just above the Tip] (This feature relies on the use of the DV camera's internal clock. Therefore, it doesn't work if you haven't set your camcorder's clock. It also doesn't work if you're playing from a non-DV tape, using one of the techniques described on page 112-114.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 112

The text used to read: Sony Digital8 camcorders accommodate 8 mm, Hi-8, and Digital8 tapes (8 mm cassettes recorded digitally). It now reads: Most Sony Digital8 camcorders accommodate 8 mm, Hi-8, and Digital8 tapes (8 mm cassettes recorded digitally). (Low-end models like the TRV130 may not offer this feature, however; ask before you buy.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 113
The last sentence of the second paragraph under "Approach 3" used to

read: The Sony box costs about $400 at this writing. It now reads: The Sony box costs about $400 at this writing. The very similar Hollywood-DV Bridge (www.dazzle.com) is $300.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 114

The text used to read: All of Sony's current DV and Digital8 camcorders offer a spectacular solution to the "old tapes" problem: analog-to-digital passthrough conversion. In other words, the camcorder itself acts as one of the media converters described above. The footage never hits a DV tape; instead, it simply plays from your older VCR or camcorder directly into the Macintosh. (The models offering this feature are the TRV-11, TRV-20, TRV-900, PC5, PC100, and VX2000, plus the Digital8 models-the TRV-120, 320, 520, 525, 720, and 820.) It now reads: Most of Sony's current DV and Digital8 camcorders offer a spectacular solution to the "old tapes" problem: analog-to-digital passthrough conversion. In other words, the camcorder itself acts as one of the media converters described above. The footage never hits a DV tape; instead, it simply plays from your older VCR or camcorder directly into the Macintosh. (Ask before you buy; some models, such as the PC100, lack this feature. On others, you must use the camcorder's on-board menu system to enable the live passthrough.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 146

The text used to read: error message shown at bottom right in Figure 6-6 It now reads: error message shown at bottom right in Figure 6-5

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 169

The sixth item label in Figure 7-1 used to read: Fontmenu It now reads: Font menu

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 178

The text used to read: import it into your project as you would any graphics file, as described on page 237 It now reads: import it into your project as you would any graphics file, as described on page 234

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 182

The caption used to read: you'll see that the second clip has been shortened by two seconds It now reads: you'll see that the second clip has been shortened by one second

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 194
1st paragraph

"... makes Hollywood computers seen even less like real-world computers." should be: "... makes Hollywood computers seem even less like real-world computers."

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 219

The text used to read: I want to do a split edit, or a J-edit. You know, where the dialogue from the next scene begins while we're still looking at the Þnal seconds of the previous scene. Can you do that in iMovie 2? [italicize this paragraph]

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 221
Removed the bullet before "Now" in the first paragraph.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 222-224

{This new section has been inserted before "Extracting Audio from Video." The sidebars on pages 222 and 224 have been cut to make room.} The Audio Pop: The Cockroach of iMovie Bugs If you haven't found it yet, you will: When you paste video over existing audio (in iMovie 2.0 through 2.0.3, at least), you sometimes hear a little pop or lose part of a word. No amount of fiddling seems to get rid of it. Apple admits that this is a doozie of a bug, and that a substantial rewrite of the program would be required to fix it. There's no easy fix, but there are workarounds. For example, you can try to perform your paste-overs during momentary silences in the underlying audio track (pauses in the speech, for example), or to add very short audio fades at the ends of the affected clips. If that's not practical, you can try this more elaborate trick, in which you set aside a copy of clean, virgin audio before making the paste, and then use it to replace the audio pop after the paste: 1. Before pasting, copy the clip you're cutting into (the one with the audio you want to save). Paste it at the end of the Timeline Viewer. You've just set aside a pure, uncorrupted copy. 2. Perform the video overlay. Turn off the sound for each of the resulting clips. There may be as many as three clips that resulted from the overlay: the video you pasted and the "bookends" of original video on either side of it. Click one of these clips; drag the volume slider beneath the tracks all the way to the left. Repeat with the other clips involved in the overlay. The entire section should now play back silently. 3. Click the clip at the end of the timeline. Choose Advanced ®Extract Audio. The audio now appears as an independent clip, as described on the next page. 5. Drag or copy/paste the extracted audio clip into sync with the silent overlay clip(s). The untouched copy of the original audio now provides the sound for the paste-over sequence. (Delete the orphaned video clip at the end of the Timeline Viewer.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 237
Deleted the last sentence in the left-hand column of the "Infrequently

Asked Question": "By the time you type 107,863 (a few seconds shy of iMovie's 59:59:00 limit), iMovie says that you're at the limit."

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 240

The text used to read: these numbers have probably become engraved into your cerebellum). It now reads: these numbers have probably become engraved into your cerebrum.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 254

The text used to read: Otherwise, it's safe to say that iMovie fans only rarely go to the trouble of creating the most common kind of reaction shot, in which we cut to a listener's reaction as the sound of the speaker's voice continues. Creating this effect requires that you separate the video from the soundtrack, which, in iMovie, is no picnic; it involves exporting your movie's sound track to another editing program, as described in Chapter 8. It now reads: Otherwise, it's safe to say that iMovie 2 fans create reaction shots far more often than they did when using iMovie 1; now it's easy to cut to a listener's reaction as the sound of the speaker's voice continues. Creating this effect requires that you separate the video from the soundtrack, as described on page 219.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 268

The text used to read: That's a real problem if you intend to create moves It now reads: That's a real problem if you intend to create movies

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 270

The text used to read: {insert this tip before the heading "The Protect-Tape Tab"} It now reads: Tip: If you have a Sony Digital8 camcorder, another option is open to you: Buy 180-minute Hi-8 tapes, such as the Sony E6-180HME. You won't find them at your local drugstore, that's for sure, but www.b&h.com, for example, carries them. These tapes let you fit a full 90 minutes of high-quality footage on a single cartridge, without the downsides of LP mode. (They're a good way to return finished over-and-hour iMovies back to tape, too.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 270

The text used to read: <add this note at the end of the chapter:> It now reads: Note: Digital8 (Hi8) tapes record lock works backwards from miniDV cassettes; the little red slider covers the hole to prevent recording, and must be open to record.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 271

The last sentence of the third paragraph used to read: And if you have an extra $10,000 lying around, you can even make your own DVD videodisks; just polish up your movies, burn them onto DVDs, and then call up the national buyer for Blockbuster. It now reads: And with the aid of Apple's SuperDrive and iDVD software (see page 299), you can even make your own DVD videodisks; just polish up your movies, burn them onto DVDs, and then call up the national buyer for Blockbuster.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 295

The last sentence in the third bullet used to read: You bought a lot of expensive equipment to make this disk. It now reads: This is what Apple's iDVD is all about, as described on page 299.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 297

The first paragraph under "Phase 2" used to read: At one time, the best-known MPEG-1 creation software was Astarte M.Pack. In early 2000, however, Apple bought Astarte and took M.Pack off the market; Apple will probably re-introduce the program under a new name, and with new features, in 2001. (Visit this book's page at www.missingmanual.com to see if this blessed event has occurred.) It now reads: At one time, the best-known MPEG-1 creation software was Astarte M.Pack. In early 2000, however, Apple bought Astarte and took M.Pack off the market, in order to use its technology for creating iDVD, described on page 299.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 297

The text used to read: At one time, the best-known MPEG-1 creation software was Astarte M.Pack. In early 2000, however, Apple bought Astarte and took M.Pack off the market; Apple will probably re-introduce the program under a new name, and with new features, in 2001. (Visit this book's page at www.missingmanual.com to see if this blessed event has occurred.) It now reads: At one time, the best-known MPEG-1 creation software was Astarte M.Pack. In early 2000, however, Apple bought Astarte and took M.Pack off the market, in order to use its technology for creating iDVD, described on page 299.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 297

The text used to read: {insert this before "iDiscWriter"} It now reads: ¥ Toast Titanium. The latest versions of Toast (www.roxio.com) add a Toast VCD option directly to the Export dialog box of iMovie, making this by far the simplest and least expensive route to Video CD making.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 298-300
Replaced the text beginning with "Creating a DVD" with the following

Burning a DVD with iDVD If your iMovie production is really good, you may have had visions of Tower Video dancing in your head. And, sure enough, it's perfectly possible to create professional-quality DVD disks just like the ones that come out of Hollywood. A DVD is a complicated work of art, often featuring menus, alternate soundtracks, a choice of camera angles, and the other goodies that make rented or purchased DVDs so exciting. Until recently, it therefore required an equally complicated piece of software called a DVD authoring program, such as the $2,500 MPEG Power Professional DVD (www.heuris.com). Then, even after buying the software, you still needed a machine to burn the DVD discs: the Pioneer DVR-S201, which costs another $5,400. Blank DVDs used to cost about $40 each. All of this changed explosively in January 2001, when Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced two new products: the SuperDrive and iDVD. The SuperDrive, available at first only in certain Power Macintosh G4 models, is a combination CD/DVD player and CD/DVD recorder. In other words, Apple has broken new ground; it's selling a $3,500 computer that includes an adaptation of the very same $5,400 Panasonic DVD burner described above. iDVD, meanwhile, is the extremely easy to use, free software that comes with the SuperDrive. The steps for creating a DVD are simple: First, update your copy of iMovie to version 2.0.3 or later, using the free updater at www.apple.com/imovie. Then, when you're finished editing your project in iMovie, choose File -> Export; in the Export dialog box, choose the "For iDVD" option. Save the file to your hard drive, keeping in mind that it will occupy a relatively enormous amount of space. Next, drag your exported movies from your desktop into the iDVD window, as shown in Figure 12-12. Drag them around into a sequence you like; click their names to retitle them. Use the slider that appears when you click a thumbnail to choose the frame you'll want to represent that movie in this "table of contents" view. Use the Themes controls to specify a look for your main menu screen, or drag a graphics file from your desktop into the iDVD window to use it as the backdrop for your main menu. Click the Preview button in the lower-right corner to summon a virtual remote control, which you can use to hold a dress rehearsal for the finished DVD; for example, when you click one of the thumbnail images, the DVD player will play the corresponding movie. Finally, click the Burn DVD button at the lower-right corner of the screen; insert a blank DVD (which Apple sells in five-packs for $50). Your SuperDrive does the rest. It takes about two hours to burn one hour of video (the maximum for iDVD), a far cry from the 12 or 24 hours required by previous DVD software. You can play the resulting disk in any standard DVD player; your audience will at last get to savor your digital video in its full glory. Tip: If you can't justify buying a new Mac just to burn a couple of DVDs, you can hire a video service to do much of the work for you. For example, you can send the MPEG-2 Þles necessary for DVD mastering to a DVD mastering facility, who's already got the equipment. (Search the Web for DVD mastering services; you'll Þnd plenty of them, including www.digitalforce.com and www.ßickfactory.com.) The service costs about $300.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 298

The text used to read: MPEG-1 format can take quite a bit of time--several per minute of your movie It now reads: MPEG-1 format can take quite a bit of time--several hours per minute of your movie

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 323

The text used to read: (The same password works for QuickTime 3, 4, and 5; you don't need a new serial number if you've ever paid for one.) It now reads: (The same password works for QuickTime 3 and 4, but you need a new serial number to unlock QuickTime Pro 5.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 326
The second sentence in the second paragraph under"Manipulating Tracks"

used to read: "In fact, doing so is precisely the central move in overlaying new video over an existing audio track (see page 219)." It now reads: "(Old-timers may remember that this was the central move in overlaying new video over an existing audio track in iMovie 1.)"

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 332
Inserted the following paragraph before the Tip

If you highlight some footage and then press Shift-Option, the Edit -> Paste command changes to say Add Scaled. Whatever you're pasting gets stretched or compressed in time so that it fits the highlighted region, speeding up or slowing down both audio and video accordingly. The effect can be very powerful, very comical, or just weird.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 335

The text used to read: Or maybe you'd like to overlay video over audio without having to use the workaround described in Chapter 8. <cut the sentence>

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 337

The text used to read: EditDV EditDV (Digital Origin, www.digitaloriginal.com) It now reads: EditDV (Cinestream) EditDV (just renamed Cinestream by its maker, www.digitaloriginal.com)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 364

The text used to read: turned off the extension called It now reads: turned off the extension (in systems before Mac OS 9) called

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 369

The second section used to read: The Picture Appears in Widescreen Format If your footage appears in widescreen format-a width-to-height ratio of 16:9, just like a Hollywood movie-once again, some non-Apple software is probably to blame. This particular glitch is a side effect of the Action GoMac control panel. (It affects only some camcorders.) It now reads: Weird Font-Cropping Glitches If the font iMovie uses for its clip names and timecodes doesn't look right (for example, the labels get chopped off), you probably have Microsoft Office, whose Curlz MT font conflicts with iMovie 2's font. To solve the proble, open your System Folder -> Fonts folder and remove the Curlz icon, then restart iMovie.

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 390
Changed the following index entry

DVDit, 299 To: DVDs burning your own, 298-300

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 393
Added the following term to the index

iDVD, 299

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001
Printed
Page 395

The index entry used to read: Mac OS X Server, 317 It now reads: Mac OS X, 90, 317

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 399
Added the following term to the index

SuperDrive, 299

Anonymous    Feb 01, 2001