Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments

Errata for Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments

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The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed, PDF
Page 149
Required Equipment and Supplies

"graduated cylinder, 100 ml" is not used in Laboratory 8.1, but it is listed as required equipment.

Note from the Author or Editor:
This erratum is correct. Please delete the item mentioned.

Bora Eryilmaz  Nov 07, 2013  Jan 17, 2014
Printed, PDF
Page 104
The box about "DISPOSAL:".

"The filtrate from step 19" should be "The filtrate from step 4" since there is no step 19 in this Lab. But there is step 4 in the second part of the lab that talks about the filtrate and the first part has 15 steps (15+4=19).

Note from the Author or Editor:
Please change "The filtrate from step 19 contains only sodium sulfate" to "The filtrate from step 4 in the second part of the procedure contains only sodium sulfate" I'm not sure how the numbering got restarted. In the original manuscript, the step now numbered 1. (the second #1) was step 16.

Bora Eryilmaz  Oct 30, 2013  Jan 17, 2014
Printed
Page 133
Item #3 in the list on the left column.

"0.50 M, or 0.50 mol/L" should be "0.50 m, or 0.50 mol/kg" since Lab 7.2 is about making "molal" solutions, not "molar" ones.

Note from the Author or Editor:
This erratum is correct. Please change "our stock solution 0.50 M, or 0.50 mol/L" to "our stock solution 0.50 m, or 0.50 mol/kg" (note the change from upper-case M to lower-case m)

Bora Eryilmaz  Oct 27, 2013  Jan 17, 2014
Printed, PDF, Safari Books Online
Page xv
End of section

Please add the following text to the end of the How To Contact Us sidebar (if you need more room for it, please delete the Hacks entry from the list, since that is defunct. If you still need more room, let me know): Since this book was first published in 2008, we've gotten many requests from homeschoolers for an affordable kit for a rigorous, hands-on first-year chemistry lab course. In 2011, we designed that kit and began selling it. While our kit is more rigorous and quantitative than most homeschool chemistry lab kits, it is considerably less so than doing the experiments in this book. Of course, the kit is also considerably less expensive than buying the equipment and chemicals needed for this book. Our advice: if you are pursuing chemistry as a hobby or intend to homeschool AP chemistry, buy the materials you need to do all of the experiments in this book. Conversely, if all you want is a comprehensive first-year chemistry lab experience for your homeschool student, buy the kit. To learn more, visit http://www.thehomescientist.com/kits/CK01/ck01-main.html

Brian Jepson
Brian Jepson
O'Reilly AuthorO'Reilly Blogger 
Nov 21, 2011  Dec 20, 2011
Printed
Page 201
column 1, last bullet item, line 4

Change 100 mL to 20 mL.

Brian Jepson
Brian Jepson
O'Reilly AuthorO'Reilly Blogger 
Jun 01, 2010  Dec 20, 2011
Printed
Page 201
column 1, last bullet item, line 3

Change 90 mL to 18 mL.

Brian Jepson
Brian Jepson
O'Reilly AuthorO'Reilly Blogger 
Jun 01, 2010  Dec 20, 2011
Printed
Page 387
Please add the following as a Note at the bottom of the left column:

Kastle-Meyer Solution To prepare the Kastle-Meyer phenolphthalein solution, dissolve 0.1 g of phenolphthalein powder in 10.0 mL of 25% w/v aqueous sodium hydroxide in a test tube and add 0.1 g of mossy zinc and a boiling chip. Boil the solution very gently, adding water as necessary to maintain the volume, until the bright pink solution turns colorless or slightly yellowish. Allow it to cool, decant off the liquid, and dilute it to 100 mL with 70% ethanol. Store in a tightly-capped brown bottle.

Anonymous  Dec 14, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 295
Bottom left paragraph

Delete everything after "in the lemon juice provide internal electric connectivity between the half-cells." Somehow we ended up with a cut-and-paste repeat of the last sentence in the 1st paragraph on the top right of the page.

Anonymous  Dec 14, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 151
In “Disposal” section, please replace existing text with the following:

Retain all of the solutions for use in the following laboratory session. Allow all of the solutions to cool to room temperature, and then place them in the refrigerator to chill them. A typical refrigerator maintains a temperature of about 5 °C. Having the solutions at this temperature reduces the time required for the freezing point determinations in the following laboratory session. (I violate my general rule of avoiding mixing laboratory materials with kitchen materials because these solutions contain only food compounds.)

Anonymous  Dec 14, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 151
In “Optional Activities” section, please replace the second bullet item with:

Repeat the experiment, but dissolve sufficient sodium chloride and sucrose in the initial 100 g of water to make the solution 1.5 molal with respect to both solutes. (Warm the water if necessary to dissolve all of the solids.) Calculate the expected boiling point elevation and then determine the actual boiling point elevation for the solution.

Anonymous  Dec 14, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 150
Please replace all of sections Part II and Part III with the following:

Part II – Prepare molal solutions of sodium chloride and sucrose To test the effect of molality and dissociation on boiling point, we need to prepare solutions of ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds of known molality. I chose to use sodium chloride and sucrose because both of these chemicals are inexpensive, readily available, and extremely soluble in water. Sodium chloride is ionic. In solution, sodium chloride dissociates into sodium ions (Na+) and chloride ions (Cl-), and should therefore have a van't Hoff factor of 2. Sucrose is molecular, and should therefore have a van't Hoff factor of 1. Coincidentally, the solubility of both sodium chloride and sucrose in water at room temperature is just over 6 mol/L. We'll therefore prepare 6 molal, 3 molal, and 1.5 molal solutions of both of these compounds. 1. If you have not already done so, put on your splash goggles, gloves, and protective clothing. 2. Label a foam cup "6 molal sodium chloride", place it on the balance, and tare the balance to read 0.00 g. 3. Add hot tap water to the foam cup until the balance reads as closely as possible to 100.00 g. As you approach 100.00 g, use a pipette or dropper to add water dropwise. 4. Remove the cup from the balance, substitute a weighing paper, and transfer 35.07 g of sodium chloride to the weighing paper. This amount (0.6 moles) of sodium chloride added to 100.00 g of water is sufficient to make up a 6.0 molal solution of sodium chloride. 5. Transfer the 35.07 g of sodium chloride to the foam cup. Stir it periodically as you are making up the other solutions until all of the sodium chloride dissolves. 6. Repeat steps 2 through 5 in two additional labeled foam cups to make up sodium chloride solutions of 3.0 molal (100.00 g of water plus 17.53 g of sodium chloride) and 1.5 molal (100.00 g of water plus 8.77 g of sodium chloride). 7. Repeat steps 2 through 6 in three additional labeled foam cups to make up sucrose solutions of 6.0 molal (100.00 g of water plus 205.38 g of sucrose), 3.0 molal (100.00 g of water plus 102.69 g of sucrose) and 1.5 molal (100.00 g of water plus 51.34 g of sucrose). Part III – Determine the boiling points of sodium chloride, sucrose, and sodium carbonate solutions In this part of the lab, we determine the boiling points of the sodium chloride and sucrose solutions. 1. If you have not already done so, put on your splash goggles, gloves, and protective clothing. 2. Transfer the 6 molal sodium chloride solution to the 250 mL beaker. Place the beaker on the heat source and apply gentle heat with constant stirring until the contents of the beaker come to a full boil. 3. Immerse the thermometer in the beaker, making sure it does not contact the beaker itself, allow the thermometer to stabilize, and record the temperature reading in Table 8-1. 4. Remove the beaker from the heat and place it aside to cool. Transfer the solution from the beaker back into its labeled foam cup. Rinse the beaker thoroughly and dry it. 5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 for the 3.0 molal and 1.5 molal sodium chloride solutions and the 6.0 molal, 3.0 molal, and 1.5 molal sucrose solutions. 6. Using the observed boiling point elevations for each of the solutions and the van't Hoff factors for each solute, calculate the formula weights of sodium chloride and sucrose, and enter those values in Table 8-1.

Anonymous  Dec 14, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 66 & 67
Starting with #4 at top of right column, please replace all material through the end of that chapter with the following:

4. Buy the chemical from a vendor that does not charge hazardous shipping surcharges on small amounts of chemicals. With the exception of concentrated nitric acid and a few other chemicals, small amounts (typically 25 g or mL to 100 g or mL) of most hazardous chemicals can be shipped without surcharges under Small Quantity Exemption or ORM-D regulations. BUYING CHEMICALS THE EASY WAY In addition to individual chemicals, Maker Shed (http://www.makershed.com) offers various chemical kits that include, with the exception of nitric acid, most or all of the specialty chemicals needed to complete the lab sessions in this book.

Anonymous  Dec 14, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 396
Step 5

Step 5 is missing a closing parenthesis.

Anonymous  Jan 07, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 387
step 6

step 6 should read "a sample /of/ rust..." Thanks to a reader who wishes to remain anonymous for pointing this out.

Anonymous  Jan 07, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 358
the last bullet of Optional Activities

the last bullet of Optional Activities should read, "Reproduce the experiment that Dr. Mary Chervenak describes in her comments above." Thanks to a reader who wishes to remain anonymous for pointing this out.

Anonymous  Jan 07, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 353
Truncated question

The question is truncated. It should read: "Is it possible to test the dissolved bone sample to determine whether carbonate ion was present in the original solid sample? If not, explain why and devise a test procedure to determine whether carbonate ion was present in the original solid sample."

Anonymous  Jan 07, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 337
Caution about HCl

The Caution about HCl is not necessary because that chemical is not used in this lab. Thanks to a reader who wishes to remain anonymous for pointing this out.

Anonymous  Jan 07, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 276
bottom left paragraph

the construct "J/g * K" should be "J/(g * K)".

Anonymous  Jan 07, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 116
the third sentence of the third item in Substitutions and Modifications

The third sentence of the third item in Substitutions and Modifications is missing a word. "Use a large tin can lid or burner to isolate..." should read "Use a large tin can lid or burner cover to isolate..." Thanks to a reader who wishes to remain anonymous for the correction.

Anonymous  Jan 07, 2009  Jan 01, 2010
Printed
Page 206
Lab 11.4, 1st paragraph under the Procedure heading

Please change tritrant to titrant.

Anonymous  Aug 07, 2008  Jan 01, 2010