iPod: The Missing Manual

Errata for iPod: The Missing Manual

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page 5
4th paragraph

Sentence reads: At about a quarter of an inch think, and tipping the scales zt ... Should be: At about a quarter of an inch thick, and tipping the scales at...

Marc Helfman  Jan 26, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 69
3rd paragraph

The last two sentences of the paragraph, which comes at the end of Chapter 3, direct one to "this book's 'Missing Cd' page at www.missingmanuals.com" if one needs "help sorting through email geekery like the difference between IMPA and POP." The Missing CD-ROM for this manual has nothing at all for Chapter 3 and nothing on this subject elsewhere.

Anonymous  Jan 24, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 89
Last sentence in second-to-last paragraph

The only files that don’t get converted are protected ones: Audible.com tracks and tracks from the iTunes Store that still have copy-protection built in. If you bought the track after January 2009, though, odds are you have a high-quality iTunes Plus track (page 141) that’s delightfully free of such restrictions.”

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 110
Last bullet point

Change “handy freeware” to “$18 shareware”

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 131
Middle paragraph; add after the last sentence:

In January 2009, Apple announced it was even doing away with restrictive copy protections built into most songs in the Store. This liberating act gave customers unlimited uses for their music and even the ability to play them on (gasp!) non-Apple players.

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 136
Last paragraph

Change “18-page statement” to “24-page statement”

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 139
Add Note box to bottom of the page:

Note: The 99-cent song was the set price in the iTunes Store for years, but as of April 2009, Apple is mixing things up a bit thanks to new deals with the record labels. Depending on the track, it could cost 69 cents, 99 cents, or $1.29. Albums remain dependably steady at about $10 a shot.

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 147
First bullet point. Add after last sentence:

iTunes Plus tracks (page 159) are exempt from these rules.

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 158
First paragraph

In second sentence, insert “copy-protected” after “play” so the sentence reads: So Apple lets you play copy-protected Store purchased on up to five computers: Macs, PCs, or any combination.

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 159
Expand Tip box at the bottom of the page and replace text

The copy-protection and restrictions are built into videos and some iTunes music tracks. Songs and other content in the high-quality iTunes Plus format are “DRM-free”—that is, free of the digital-rights management software that disables iTunes tracks after you hit your usage limits. In January 2009, Apple announced it was making iTunes Plus versions of just about all its 10 million songs. This means no computer-authorization or CD-burn limits; tracks will even work on non-iPod music players. But be careful about trading Store purchases around the Internet—the name and email address on your iTunes account are easily visible on the file’s Summary screen (page 78).

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 160
Slide up art and add tip box:

Tip: Want the hassle-free life of an iTunes Plus library? Go to the iTunes Store and click the link or icon for iTunes Plus on the main page. You can upgrade your older tracks to iTunes Plus versions for 30 cents a pop—instead of having to buy them all over again at the full price.

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009
Printed
Page 233
Third bullet point; Flickr app name changed.

Change “Exposure” to “DarkSlide” in text and accompanying caption ID for figure on page.

scottd_oreilly  Feb 12, 2009  Mar 01, 2009