Microsoft® Office Excel® 2007: Data Analysis and Business Modeling

Errata for Microsoft® Office Excel® 2007: Data Analysis and Business Modeling




The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page viii

"row" should be "column" On page viii, the second sentence in the last bullet point on the page includes incorrect information. Change: "When you copy a formula that contains a cell reference such as $A4 (a mixed cell address) the row will remain fixed, but the column will change." To: "When you copy a formula that contains a cell reference such as $A4 (a mixed cell address) the column will remain fixed but the row will change."

Microsoft Press  May 06, 2010  Mar 25, 2011
Printed
Page 16

Annual loan rate formula image incorrect On page 16, Step 5, the image of the formula used to calculate the annual loan rate is incorrect. Change: 1/4(9)+3/4(10)=9.25% To: 1/4(10)+3/4(9)=9.25%

Microsoft Press  Jul 13, 2010  Aug 18, 2010
Printed
Page 39

"nineteenth" should be "twentieth" and "twentieth" should be "twenty first" On page 39, the paragraph under the last 4 bullet points on the page includes incorrect century references. Change: "If you enter only two digits to represent a year, and the digits are 30 or higher, Excel assumes the digits represent years in the twentieth century; if the digits are lower than 30, Excel assumes they represent years in the nineteenth century. For example, 1/1/29 is treated as January 1, 2029, but 1/1/30 is treated as January 1, 1930. Each year, the year treated as dates in the twentieth century increases by one." To: "If you enter only two digits to represent a year, and the digits are 30 or higher, Excel assumes the digits represent years in the twenty first century; if the digits are lower than 30, Excel assumes they represent years in the twentieth century. For example, 1/1/29 is treated as January 1, 2029, but 1/1/30 is treated as January 1, 1930. Each year, the year treated as dates in the twenty first century increases by one." Microsoft Press is committed to providing informative and accurate books. All comments and corrections listed above are ready for inclusion in future printings of this book. If you have a later printing of this book, it may already contain most or all of the above corrections.

Microsoft Press  May 06, 2010  Aug 18, 2010
Printed
Page 110
middle of page

Page 110 - states that Chapter 7 -"Evaluating Investment by Using Net Present Value Criteria" contains a discussion on how to estimate a demand curve. Chapter 70 actually contains the "Estimating a Demand Curve" discusion

Anonymous  Mar 15, 2010  Mar 25, 2011