Mac OS 9: The Missing Manual

Errata for Mac OS 9: The Missing Manual

Submit your own errata for this product.


The errata list is a list of errors and their corrections that were found after the product was released. If the error was corrected in a later version or reprint the date of the correction will be displayed in the column titled "Date Corrected".

The following errata were submitted by our customers and approved as valid errors by the author or editor.

Color Key: Serious Technical Mistake Minor Technical Mistake Language or formatting error Typo Question Note Update



Version Location Description Submitted By Date Submitted Date Corrected
Printed
Page vi

The Apple-menu logo symbol appeared, in the original printing, as a capital letter A in two places. The correct font was restored in this printing.

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page ix
Last paragraph:

Sentence restores the missing word "for" in the sentence: "Danny has done work for several big New York trade housesŠ"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page x
Added this line to end of page

"Quicken 2001 by Kathy Ivens and Thomas E. Barich"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 1
The comma was restored to the list that includes "Application menu,

Control StripŠ"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 5
IN PRINT: Figure 1-2, 4th line

"...from the submenu that than..." SHOULD BE: "...from the submenu that then..."

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 6
Insert this sidebar

As this book went to press, Apple unveiled Mac OS 9.1, which offers one big-ticket new feature: a Window menu in the Finder. It lists every open desktop window, making it easy to summon a buried window by choosing its name. If you press certain keys as you choose a window's name, you get all kinds of nifty extra features. For example, the Command key closes a window, as though by remote control. Cmd-Shift closes a pop-up window - a great time saver. Cmd-Option brings a window to the front and closes all other windows. Control brings a window to the front and "windowshades" all other windows; and Control-Option brings a window to the front and un-windowshades all others. Other changes are minor, but welcome: Mac OS 9.1's Applications folder is now called "Applications (Mac OS 9)," to help you find your programs when, one day, you install Mac OS X. The General Controls control panel has been updated (see page 199). Two new control panels are available, too: Image Capture, for grabbing pictures directly from USB digital cameras, and USB Printer Sharing, which lets you print on a USB printer that's connected elsewhere on your network. [Editor's note 1/31/01: The Image Capture control panel was cut from the final release of Mac OS 9.1.] At this writing, the price and final version number of Mac OS 9.1 haven't been nailed down; but if history is any guide, you can download a free updater from www.apple.com.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 6

The text used to read: As this book went to press, Apple unveiled Mac OS 9.1, which offers one big-ticket new feature: a Window menu in the Finder. It lists every open desktop window, making it easy to summon a buried window by choosing its name. If you press certain keys as you choose a window's name, you get all kinds of nifty extra features. For example, Command closes a window, as though by remote control. Command-Shift closes a pop-up window-a great time saver. Command-Option brings a window to the front and closes all other windows. Control brings a window to the front and "windowshades" all other windows; and Control-Option brings a window to the front and un-windowshades all others. Other changes are minor, but welcome: Mac OS 9.1's Applications folder is now called "Applications (Mac OS 9)," to help you find your programs when, one day, you install Mac OS X. The General Controls control panel has been updated (see page 199). Two new control panels are available, too: Image Capture, for grabbing pictures directly from USB digital cameras, and USB Printer Sharing, which lets you print on a USB printer that's connected elsewhere on your network. At this writing, the price and final version number of Mac OS 9.1 haven't been nailed down; but if history is any guide, you can download a free updater from www.apple.com. It now reads: Mac OS 9.1 and Mac OS 9.2 In January 2001, Apple unveiled Mac OS 9.1, which offers one big-ticket new feature: a Window menu in the Finder. It lists every open desktop window, making it easy to summon a buried window by choosing its name. If you press certain keys as you choose a window's name, you get all kinds of nifty extra features. For example, Command closes a window, as though by remote control. Command-Shift closes a pop-up window-a great time saver. Command-Option brings a window to the front and closes all other windows. Control brings a window to the front and "windowshades" all other windows; and Control-Option brings a window to the front and un-windowshades all others. Other changes are minor, but welcome: Mac OS 9.1's Applications folder is now called "Applications (Mac OS 9)," to help you find your programs when you move to Mac OS X. The General Controls, Sound, and Startup Disk control panels have been updated (see Chapter 12). The USB Printer Sharing control panel is all new: It lets you print on a USB printer that's connected elsewhere on your network. Later in 2001, Apple released yet another touch-up: Mac OS 9.2, which offers bug fixes and much better speed as the "Classic" mode in Mac OS X. Both updaters-OS 9.1 and 9.2-are free downloads from the Apple Web site if you already have Mac OS 9-point-anything.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 14
The text used to read

(If you, an iMac or iBook owner, find some of these keys missing from your keyboard, install KeySwapper, included with this book.) It now reads: "(If you find some of these keys missing from your keyboard, install KeySwapper, available at www.missingmanual.com.)"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 14
The Figure 1-5 caption did read

"Position your mouse inside a Finder window (list views not included); while..." Now reads: "Position your mouse inside a Finder window (list views not included) or even an Internet Explorer window (5.0 and later); while..."

Anonymous    Oct 01, 2000
Printed
Page 15
The third sentence in the paragraph under the heading "Folder Proxy Icon"

used to read: "By dragging this tiny icon..." It now reads: "By clicking this tiny icon (until it darkens) and then dragging..."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 23
Figure 1-16. The text used to say:

"Or press the equivalent keystroke: (Cmd)-right arrow." It now says: "Or press the equivalent keystrokes: (Cmd)-right arrow (to open) and (Cmd)-left arrow (to close)."

Anonymous    Oct 01, 2000
Printed
Page 38

The text used to read: And if you use Sherlock (see Chapter 15), you can create an alias of any icon in the Items Found window by Command-dragging it (with no Option key) out of the window. It now reads: And if you use Sherlock (see Chapter 15), you can create an alias of any icon in the Items Found window by Command-Option-dragging it out of the window.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 47
The Figure 2-13 caption used to say

But it does trigger the Trash-emptying warning... It now says: But it does trigger a "Some items could not be deleted because they are locked" warning...

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2000
Printed
Page 95
The caption used to read

"the Mac reminds you that youčre about eliminate it forever" It now reads: "the Mac reminds you that youčre about to eliminate it forever"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 111
The text used to say:

"Mac OS9 itself uses about 20 MB of memory." It now says: "Mac OS9 itself uses 20 to 30 MB of memory, depending on the Mac model."

Anonymous    Oct 01, 2000
Printed
Page 118
In the first paragraph of "Using Virtual Memory to Save RAM and LaunchTime"

The text used to say: Except for iBook, every Mac model sold today comes with at least 64 MB of memory. It now says: Every Mac model sold today comes with at least 64 MB of memory.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2000
Printed
Page 143
second paragraph

The reference (in the second paragraph) to Figure 9-4 has been corrected to say "see Figure 9-3."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 155
In the third paragraph, the text used to say:

In general, you'll want this option turned off; see Figure 10-3 to see what happens if you turn it on. It now says: In general, you'll want this option turned on; see Figure 10-3 to see what happens if you turn it off.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2000
Printed
Page 199
The second-to-last paragraph used to read

"There they sit, dimmed and unavailable. Just remember: It's not you. It's Apple." It now reads: "There they sat, dimmed and unavailable, until they disappeared in Mac OS 9.1's redesigned, Multiple Users-compatible General Controls panel."

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 199

called Check Disk in Mac OS 9.1 It now reads: called Check Disk in Mac OS 9.1 and later

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 200

(Delete the entire Image Control control panel discussion; Apple omitted this control panel from the final release of Mac OS 9.1.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 201

It now reads: (Delete the entire Image Control control panel discussion; Apple omitted this control panel from the final release of Mac OS 9.1.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 203

The text used to read: Tip: Instead of using the keyboard menu, you can rotate through the different keyboard layouts you've selected by pressing Command-Space bar. It now reads: You can rotate through the different keyboard layouts in the script you've selected by pressing Command-Space bar.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 211

The text used to read: Using the four control categories listed at the left side of the window, you can configure the sound system of your Mac in the following ways: Alert Sounds It now reads: Using the four control categories listed at the left side of the window (or, in Mac OS 9.1 and later, in tabs across the top), you can configure the sound system of your Mac in the following ways: Alert Sounds (Alerts tab)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 213

The text used to read: Speaker Setup It now reads: Speaker Setup (Speakers tab)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 215
Insert this material

USB Printer Sharing New in Mac OS 9.1, this control panel lets every Mac on the network use the same USB printer (such as a color inkjet). Getting all this working may require a bit of Țddling on big networks (see the Mac Help topic "USB Printer Sharing"); but if the technology gods are smiling, all you have to do is click the Start button, click the My Printers tab, and turn on the Share checkbox for the printer to be shared. Thereafter, you can use that shared printer from another Mac on the network like this: First, install the printer's driver software. Second, open USB Printer Sharing, click the Network Printers tab, and turn on the printer's checkbox. Finally, select the shared printer in the Chooser, just as you would any printer. Web Sharing See page xx for details on this control panel.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 222
Add, after the 3d full paragraph

"(If you can't find the Automated Tasks folder, click the Missing CD-ROM link at www.missingmanual.com to download a copy.)"

Anonymous    Oct 01, 2000
Printed
Page 231
last paragraph of the Freqiently Asked Questions

In the last paragraph of the Freqiently Asked Questions, the text used to say: Otherwise, the type code is just text. It now says: Otherwise, the type code is just TEXT.

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2000
Printed
Page 238
IN PRINT: Heading "Control the cursor without the mouse", 2nd paragraph,

2nd sentence under sub-heading "Mouse Keys"; "To turn this mode off, press the Clear key to alone;" SHOULD BE: "To turn this mode off, press the Clear key alone;"

Anonymous   
Printed
Page 250

Insert this tip after 1st paragraph: Tip: If Outlook Express or Entourage is your email program, you need to take an extra step when creating a Mac.com account. Choose ToolsźAccounts; click the Mail tab (Entourage only); double-click the Mac.com account. In that window, click the Account Settings tab; enter your mac.com email address in the "E-mail address" Țeld. In the "POP server" box, enter mail.mac.com; in the "SMTP server" box, enter smtp.mac.com. Finally, click where it says "Click here for advanced sending options." In the resulting fold-out panel, turn on "SMTP server requires authentication"; close the fold-out panel, then click OK. Now your Mac.com looks and acts as though it were a bona fide ISP, and that your Mac.com address were a "real" one.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 251

(A few words were trimmed to accommodate the new tip on page 250.)

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 252
The caption for Figure 14-6 used to read

On the Apple Web page, click Open My iDisk (top left). Now wait - even with a high-speed Internet connection, it takes about a minute for your iDisk icon to appear on your desktop. At last, however, it does, bearing your member name (top right). Double-click it - and wait - to see its contents (bottom). Note that you can't create your own folders on this special disk-you must drag your Țles directly into one of the folders shown here. It now reads: On the Apple Web page, click Open My iDisk (top left). Now wait - even with a high-speed Internet connection, it takes about a minute for your iDisk icon to appear on your desktop. At last, however, it does, bearing your member name (top right). Double-click it - and wait - to see its contents (bottom). Note that you can't create your own folders on this special disk - you must drag your Țles directly into one of the folders shown here. Tip: If you have Mac OS 9.1 and use a program that offers Navigation Services (see page 131), you can save documents directly to, or open them directly from, your iDisk. The "pointing hand" icon/menu lists your iDisk just as though it's another disk drive on your Mac.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 252

The caption used to read: Tip: If you have Mac OS 9.1 It now reads: Tip: If you have Mac OS 9.1 or later

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 253
The first paragraph under "HomePage" used to say:

"(which comes with every iMac)" It now says: "(which once came with every iMac)"

Anonymous    Oct 01, 2000
Printed
Page 331

Changed "sneaky hackers" to "casual hackers."

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 331
The text used to read

"Caution: There is one way to get around the Multiple Users security‹if your Mac can start up from an older version of the Mac OS. By pressing the letter C key during startup, someone could startup the Mac from, for example, the Mac OS 8.6 CD-ROM, which predates the Multiple Users feature. In that event, the trespasser has full access to all folders on the Mac." It now reads: "Caution: There is one way to get around the Multiple Users security: Insert a system-software CD-ROM that can start up your Mac. By pressing the letter C key during startup, someone could start up the Mac from this CD; open the System Folder -> Preferences folder; and throw away the Multiple Users preferences file. In that event, the trespasser has full access to all folders on the Mac. (This tip is useful if youčve forgotten your password, too.)"

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 336

The text used to read: Yet some of the most popular Mac add-ons these days are various kinds of CD burners-special CD drives that can record onto specially designed CDs. All of these discs look like normal CDs, but they (and the drives that accommodate them) may fall into any of these categories: It now reads: Yet some of the most popular Mac drives these days are various kinds of CD burners-drives that can record onto specially designed CDs; in fact, CD burners are standard or optional equipment in all current Mac models. All of these discs look like normal CDs, but they (and the drives that accommodate them) may fall into any of these categories:

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 338
The text used to say

"Once you've inserted a CD (or Zip disk), the Mac won't let go unless you eject it the official way--by dragging its icon to the trash, or by using the Special->Eject Disk command. Yes, pushing the button on the CD-ROM door (on Mac models that have a door) opens the drawer-- when it's empty." It now says: "Once you've inserted a CD (or Zip disk), the Mac won't let go unless you eject it the official way--by dragging its icon to the trash, using the Special->Eject Disk command, or pressing the Eject key on the new Apple keyboard. Pushing the button on the CD-ROM door (on Mac models that have a door) opens the drawer--when it's empty."

Anonymous    Oct 01, 2000
Printed
Page 339

The text used to read: Figure 18-1: In the Startup Disk control panel, the currently selected disk-the one that will be "in force" the next time the machine starts up-is always highlighted. If you click in the white area, so that no disk is selected, be prepared for a very long startup cycle, as the Mac searches its various network, SCSI, and other connections for a working startup disk. It now reads: Figure 18-1: In the Startup Disk control panel, the currently selected disk-the one that will be "in force" the next time the machine starts up-is always highlighted. If you click in the white area, so that no disk is selected, be prepared for a very long startup cycle, as the Mac searches its various network, SCSI, and other connections for a working startup disk. In Mac OS 9.1 and later, the control panel looks slightly different. It offers "flippy triangles" that offer a selection of System Folders on each of your drives-a nod toward making it easier for people who like to switch back and forth between Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 380
The last paragraph in the FAQ used to read

Since Mac OS 9 debuted, a new version of QuickTime, 4.1, has already arrived, and subsequent versions are in the works. It now reads: Since Mac OS 9 debuted, a new version of QuickTime, 4.1, has already arrived, and 5.0 is available in free preview form.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 380

The text used to read: Since Mac OS 9 debuted, a new version of QuickTime, 4.1, has already arrived, and subsequent versions are in the works. It now reads: Since Mac OS 9 debuted, a new version of QuickTime, 4.1, has already arrived, and 5.0 is available in free preview form.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 388
The text used to say

But a few specialized movies may also contain a text track, and animation track... It now says: But a few specialized movies may also contain a text track, an animation track...

Anonymous    Aug 01, 2000
Printed
Page 437
The text used to say

Toast adaptec.com (no fix yet) It now says: Toast adaptec.com 4.1

Anonymous    Oct 01, 2000
Printed
Page 438
Inserted this new sidebar

Frequently Asked Question All About Mac OS 9.0.4 In April 2000, Apple released an update called Mac OS 9.0.4. You can get it in one of three ways: … Open your Software Update control panel, as described on page 210, and click the Update Now button. If your Internet connection and karma are both good, youčll be offered the chance to download and install the new software. … Second, you can download the updater directly from http://asu.info.apple.com. (Search for 9.0.4.) … Buy a CD containing the updater by sending $19.95 to Apple Order Center, Attn: 9.0.4 CD Upgrade, Box 2270, Buffalo, NY 14240-2270. So what do you get for your trouble? Bug fixes. Your Apple DVD Player software, for example, is less likely to exhibit "sound drift," in which the soundtrack gradually gets more and more out of sync with the picture. The Mac now recognizes more FireWire gadgets (camcorders and hard drives, for example), makes networking more reliable, solves some laptop battery problems, and improves the stability of audio, video, and graphics software. You dončt get any new features, per se. Installer beware, however; like any updater these days, this one brings with it further incompatibilities. For example, Action Utilities and Palm Desktop require free updaters to remain compatible with 9.0.4. If youčre on the fence about performing this installation, consult the Mac OS 9.0.4 reports at www.macfixit.com and www.macintouch.com‹fully armed, however, with the acknowledgment that most people dončt send their reports to such Web sites if everything went well with the upgrade.

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 438
The last section now reads

All About Mac OS 9.1 Mac OS 9.0.4 isn't the end of the line for Mac OS 9. In addition to still more bug fixes, the Mac OS 9.1 updater gives you two new control panels, an updated General Controls control panel, and a Window menu in the Finder that lists (and lets you manipulate) your open desktop windows. See page 6 for details.

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 438

The text used to read: All About Mac OS 9.1 Mac OS 9.0.4 isn't the end of the line for Mac OS 9. In addition to still more bug fixes, the Mac OS 9.1 updater gives you two new control panels, an updated General Controls control panel, and a Window menu in the Finder that lists (and lets you manipulate) your open desktop windows. See page 6 for details. It now reads: All About Mac OS 9.1-and Later Mac OS 9.0.4 isn't the end of the line for Mac OS 9. In addition to more bug fixes, the Mac OS 9.1 updater gives you two new control panels, updated General Controls and Sound control panels, and a Window menu in the Finder that lists (and lets you manipulate) your open desktop windows. See page 6 for details. As this book went to press, yet another system-software version was in testing, tentatively numbered Mac OS 9.2. The book in your hands is fully 9.2-ready; the Mac OS 9.2 software update offers no new features except bug fixes and-this is the big one-better service as the "Classic" mode in Mac OS X.

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001
Printed
Page 453

Added an index entry: Mac OS 9/9.0.4 upgrade, 438

Anonymous    May 01, 2000
Printed
Page 453

Add this index item Mac OS 9 9.1 upgrade, 6, 200, 215, 252, 438

Anonymous    Dec 01, 2000
Printed
Page 453
The text used to read

Mac OS 9 9.1 upgrade, 6, 200, 215, 252, 438 It now reads: Mac OS 9 9.1 upgrade, 6, 200, 215, 252, 438 9.2 upgrade, 438

Anonymous    Jun 01, 2001