Media praise for The Information Diet

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"I've rated The Information Diet 8 of 10 because I think Johnson at moments loses the battle to not engage in the kind of objectivity that he advocates and because the book has such a regionally focused audience. That said, it has changed my behavior and I think that it has a positive place. In fact I've become an advocate for many of the ideas, even when I don't recommend the book itself. I recently ran into a barrage of emails from various co-workers advocating that we "turn off technology" because it is too distracting from real life. I found this to be rather annoying because there are always distractions and tech is also important and a force for better lives. The ideas in The Information Diet have given me options to offer people that let them gain control of the information sources in their life rather than giving up and just shutting them all off. "
-- JR Peck, Slashdot.org

"I found The Information Diet simultaneously challenging, helpful and worrying...Making The Information Diet part of your information diet won’t just help you rethink how you consume information, live and work. It will make you think. "
-- David Eaves, eaves.ca

"The book's important. It's not a fad diet book, it's a healthy living diet book."
-- Rick Klau, tins:::Rick Klau's weblog

"It's a good read on several levels for the individual and has plenty of thought provoking ideas and concepts to ruminate over: we are being overrun by information options and increasingly need all the help we can get to get our time back under control."
-- Oliver Marks, ZDNet

"The Information Diet Should Be Your New Year's Resolution"
-- Bruce Upbin, Forbes

"I would highly recommend this book to believer and non-believer alike...Even if you do not agree with the prescription, this book will make you think about information consumption, educate you on the research in this field and prompt you to take control of that diet."
-- Gargi, Heartcrossings

"'The Information Diet,' just published by O'Reilly Media, however, is promoting a more long-term lifestyle adjustment, with people rethinking their media habits and making healthier choices."
-- Meg McConahey, The Press Democrat

"[Clay A. Johnson] makes the case for mindful media consumption. "
-- Jian Ghomeshi, CBC Books

"There is no such thing as a tool that is good even if used without conscious consideration. The Internet is no exception. Read this book to get a check on whether you are using the Internet as consciously as possible."
-- Jaron Lanier, author of You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto

"80 percent of Americans suffer from information obesity. That's not true, but it could be! It's time we got on a healthier information diet."
-- Baratunde Thurston, The Onion

"Unconscious consumption squanders our precious attention."
-- Ev Williams, Obvious Corporation

"I'm cutting out low-quality information and I feel happier and more productive!"
-- Jen Pahlka, Founder, Code for America

"This book convinced me I was eating too many mental calories."
-- Tim O’Reilly, CEO and Founder, O’Reilly Media

"I've decided to be much more selective about what information I feed my head."
-- Gina Trapani, Project Director, Expert Labs

"I recommend reading this book and integrating the parts that work for you into your consumption habits. Don’t go overboard, but cut out the obvious crap."
-- Paul Drapeau, The PDogg Blog

"Johnson also is the author of The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption, and he has written the column not only to further the argument of his book, but also to market the tome by seizing some space in the Los Angeles newspaper, and now the Denver newspaper as well."
-- Robert Schwab, The Huffington Post

"My favorite analogy of Johnson's...sums up the idea behind the book nicely: “The fried chicken isn’t making and purchasing itself and flying into people’s mouths. Blaming the information is equally as absurd.”"
-- Chelsi Nakano, CMSWire.com

"Read, watch and listen carefully, and continue to think critically."
-- Editor, LompocRecord.com

"A highly recommended article on how to start your information diet. No kidding. Isn’t it curious that a book called The Information Diet (Clay Johnson, 2012) spreads like wildfire even before its publication?"
-- Francisco Sáez, FacileThings

"It is essential for everyone who strives to be smart, productive, and sane."
-- Steve Bush, New Equipment Digest, February 2012

"A good framework to get started in feeding your brain better information. We need to treat our mental development with as much importance as our physical health (and, of course, they are connected). Conscious information consumption makes sense. You can’t go wrong by reading this book and trying out its ideas. "
-- Mark Dykeman, Thoughtwrestling

"An informative, pretty quick read, I'll be passing the book along to a friend and encourage them to pass it along too!"
-- M. Schafer, Amazon.com

"When it comes to your own consumption, the book has some good tips. They range from cutting down your total information consumption, building the ability to concentrate, and making sure you don't get lost in the rabbithole of email or social media."
-- Trev Roberts

"I think that the concepts and practices here desperately need to be practiced by far more people in order to stop the fragmenting of our society, as well as the ability of a few "leaders" to control the thoughts and actions of millions who don't or won't think for themselves. "
-- Thomas Duff, Co-author of IBM Lotus Sametime 8 Essentials: A User's Guide

"This strikes me as an important book for anyone who is highly plugged into the blogosphere, whether conservative or liberal. We call ourselves “information junkies” or “political junkies” for a reason: We’re addicted to that next hit of affirmation."
-- Tina Korbe, Writer & Journalist, HotAir

"It’s happened again: You said you were turning in early, but it’s 1:25 am and you’re still binging on Facebook and YouTube. This is not healthy. You must control info intake as carefully as calorie intake, says Clay A. Johnson, whose book The Information Diet has become the geek version of fad health programs like Atkins or the Zone. Media personalities and high-profile Google and Microsoft employees are publicly extolling the virtues of Johnson’s data plan. Ready to get in rock-hard info shape? Here’s his recommended regimen. "
-- Jordan Crucchiola, Wired Magazine

"In The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption, Johnson suggests that we should think twice before uncritically taking in whatever digital “junk food” may come our way."
-- Jake Adams, Spectrum Culture

"Required reading for smartphone owners developing a gnawing dependency on social media, it is an invitation to think about things that matter to you as an individual, friend and member of society."
-- John Gilbey, Times Higher Education

"To aid in that, Johnson has provided a toolkit of helpful (mostly) free software for a healthy information diet on the book's site, ranging from productivity apps to ad blockers to various setting hacks to make your favorite services and social web platforms more conducive to info-wellness."
-- Maria Popova, The Atlantic

"Any reader concerned about media marketing and information's underlying purposes will find this a thought-provoking, important guide!"
-- James A. Cox, The Midwest Book Review: The Bookwatch, The Computer Shelf, March 2012, Volume 7, Number 3

"O'Reilly Media is known for its fine books on computers and technical subjects. "The Information Diet" is an example of one of its ventures into related areas, and it's a winner... The author presents his ideas with clarity and humor, and raises our consciousness to the content of all those frantic words flowing through cyberspace, the airwaves and in hardcopy. I rarely use the ultimate five-star rating, but this is a must read for everyone--and an enjoyable one at that."
-- Babette Bloch, Golden Gate Computer Society Newsletter



"I've rated The Information Diet 8 of 10 because I think Johnson at moments loses the battle to not engage in the kind of objectivity that he advocates and because the book has such a regionally focused audience. That said, it has changed my behavior and I think that it has a positive place. In fact I've become an advocate for many of the ideas, even when I don't recommend the book itself. I recently ran into a barrage of emails from various co-workers advocating that we "turn off technology" because it is too distracting from real life. I found this to be rather annoying because there are always distractions and tech is also important and a force for better lives. The ideas in The Information Diet have given me options to offer people that let them gain control of the information sources in their life rather than giving up and just shutting them all off. "
--JR Peck, Slashdot.org