Microservices AntiPatterns and Pitfalls

Microservices AntiPatterns and Pitfalls

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Remember when service-oriented architecture (SOA) was all the rage? Companies jumped in before fully understanding SOA’s advantages and disadvantages, and struggled to make this complex architecture work. Today, we’re poised to repeat this same experience with microservices—only this time we’re prepared. With this concise ebook, author Mark Richards walks you through the ten most common microservice anti-patterns and pitfalls, and provides solutions for avoiding them.

What’s the difference between anti-patterns and pitfalls? An anti-pattern seems like a good idea when you begin, but only leads you into trouble, while pitfalls are bad ideas from the start. Learn how to avert the most flagrant anti-patterns and pitfalls before you tussle with microservice granularity, data migration, and distributed processing.

You’ll examine:

  • Data-Driven Migration Anti-Pattern
  • Timeout Anti-Pattern
  • "I Was Taught to Share" Anti-Pattern
  • Reach-in Reporting Anti-Pattern
  • Grains of Sand Pitfall
  • Developer Without a Cause Pitfall
  • Jump On The Bandwagon Pitfall
  • Static Contract Pitfall
  • Are We There Yet Pitfall
  • Give it a Rest Pitfall

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Mark Richards

Mark Richards

Mark Richards is an experienced hands-on software architect involved in the architecture, design, and implementation of Microservices Architectures, Service Oriented Architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He has been involved in the software industry since 1983, and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the President of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 thru 2003. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos, including "Software Architecture Fundamentals" (O’Reilly video), "Enterprise Messaging" (O’Reilly video), "Java Message Service 2nd Edition" (O’Reilly), and 97 Thinks Every Software Architect Should Know (O'Reilly). Mark has a masters degree in computer science and numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, The Open Group, and BEA. He is a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Symposium Series, and has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics.When he is not working Mark can usually be found hiking in the White Mountains or along the Appalachian Trail.