Microservices vs. Service-Oriented Architecture

Microservices vs. Service-Oriented Architecture

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Right now, the microservices architecture pattern is a rising star in the IT industry. For many, these small, highly decoupled services are a welcome alternative to the big, expensive, complicated Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) style that came to prominence a decade ago. But just how different are microservices from SOA?

In this report, Mark Richards, an expert in enterprise architectures and distributed systems, walks you through a detailed comparison of microservices and SOA. By learning the core differences between the two with regard to architecture style and characteristics, service characteristics, and capability, you’ll be able to make an informed choice when determining which is best for your particular situation.

  • Explore service contracts, availability, security, and transactions inherent in service-based architectures
  • Compare microservices and SOA architecture characteristics such as taxonomy, ownership and coordination, and granularity
  • Learn the differences in architecture capabilities, including application scope, heterogeneous interoperability, and contract decoupling

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Mark Richards

Mark Richards

Mark Richards is an experienced hands-on software architect involved in the architecture, design, and implementation of Microservices Architectures, Service Oriented Architectures, and distributed systems in J2EE and other technologies. He has been involved in the software industry since 1983, and has significant experience and expertise in application, integration, and enterprise architecture. Mark served as the President of the New England Java Users Group from 1999 thru 2003. He is the author of numerous technical books and videos, including "Software Architecture Fundamentals" (O’Reilly video), "Enterprise Messaging" (O’Reilly video), "Java Message Service 2nd Edition" (O’Reilly), and 97 Thinks Every Software Architect Should Know (O'Reilly). Mark has a masters degree in computer science and numerous architect and developer certifications from IBM, Sun, The Open Group, and BEA. He is a regular conference speaker at the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Symposium Series, and has spoken at over 100 conferences and user groups around the world on a variety of enterprise-related technical topics.When he is not working Mark can usually be found hiking in the White Mountains or along the Appalachian Trail.