Thomas Nadeau

Thomas Nadeau

Networking Expert and Author

  • @tdnjunisco

Areas of Expertise:

  • Networking protocols
  • Operations and Management
  • Software Defined Networks (SDN)
  • Software Driven Networks and Programmable Networks
  • open source software
  • speaking
  • programming
  • writing
Tom is a Distinguished Engineer at Brocade where he is The Chief Architect of Open Source in the Software Business Unit. Tom runs teams responsible for building commercial products based on open source, as well as contributions to upstream open source projects such as Open Daylight and Open Stack. Tom is also a member of the CTO Staff where he contributes to company wide technology strategy and architecture. Tom is co-chair of the IETF NETMOD Working Group which is responsible for the standardization of the Yang modeling language as well as Yang models. Tom has a new book out called SDN: Software Defined Networks, An authoritative Review of Network Programmability Technologies on O’Reilly Publishers. Prior to Brocade, Tom was a Distinguished Engineer in the Campus and LAN Switching Business Unit at Juniper Networks where he focuses on SDN and new data center and switching products. Prior to that Tom worked in Juniper’s PSD CTO Office where he was responsible for leading all aspects of Software Defined Networks and Network Programmability. Thomas received his BSCS from The University of New Hampshire, and a M.Sc. from The University of Massachusetts in Lowell, where he has been an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science since 2000 and teaches courses on the topic of data communications. He is also on the technical committee of several prominent networking conferences where he provides technical guidance on their content, as well as frequently presents. Tom is an active participant at the IETF, ONF and OIF. Tom enjoys farming in his "spare" time.

SDN: Software Defined Networks SDN: Software Defined Networks
by Thomas Nadeau, Ken Gray
August 2013
Print: $59.99
Ebook: $50.99

Thomas blogs at:

Four short links: 25 May 2015

May 25 2015

Why Are Eight Bits Enough for Deep Neural Networks? (Pete Warden) — It turns out that neural networks are different. You can run them with eight-bit parameters and intermediate buffers, and suffer no noticeable loss in the final results. This … read more

Four short links: 25 May 2015

May 25 2015

Why Are Eight Bits Enough for Deep Neural Networks? (Pete Warden) — It turns out that neural networks are different. You can run them with eight-bit parameters and intermediate buffers, and suffer no noticeable loss in the final results. This … read more

Kyoto’s Nasty 22% City-Bike Hill Climb

May 24 2015

距離125mで高度上昇26m、22%の坂を頑張りました。 I went out for a long bike in the mountains of northern Kyoto on Saturday, and after 120km (75mi) of tough ups and pleasant downs with friends (that I'll write about separately), I made an attempt at a hill so steep that its name on Strava is "Nasty". It's… read more

Why are Eight Bits Enough for Deep Neural Networks?

May 23 2015

Picture by Retronator Deep learning is a very weird technology. It evolved over decades on a very different track than the mainstream of AI, kept alive by the efforts of a handful of believers. When I started using it a few years ago, it reminded me of the first time… read more

Algocracy

May 23 2015

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