Gene Spafford

Gene Spafford

Professor working with security, privacy and cybercrime

West Lafayette, Indiana

Gene Spafford, Ph.D., CISSP, is an internationally renowned scientist and educator who has been working in information security, policy, cybercrime, and software engineering for nearly two decades. He is a professor at Purdue University and is the director of CERIAS, the world's premier multidisciplinary academic center for information security and assurance. Professor Spafford and his students have pioneered a number of technologies and concepts well-known in security today, including the COPS and Tripwire tools, two-stage firewalls, and vulnerability databases. Spaf, as he is widely known, has achieved numerous professional honors recognizing his teaching, his research, and his professional service. These include being named a fellow of the AAAS, the ACM, and the IEEE; receiving the National Computer Systems Security Award; receiving the William Hugh Murray Medal of the NCISSE; election to the ISSA Hall of Fame; and receiving the Charles Murphy Award at Purdue. He was named a CISSP, honoris causa in 2000. In addition to over 100 technical reports and articles on his research, Spaf is also the coauthor of Web Security, Privacy, and Commerce, and was the consulting editor for Computer Crime: A Crimefighters Handbook (both from O'Reilly).

Practical UNIX and Internet Security Practical UNIX and Internet Security
by Simson Garfinkel, Gene Spafford, Alan Schwartz
Third Edition February 2003
Print: $54.95
Ebook: $43.99

Web Security, Privacy & Commerce Web Security, Privacy & Commerce
by Simson Garfinkel
Second Edition November 2001
Print: $49.99
Ebook: $39.99

Web Security and Commerce Web Security and Commerce
by Simson Garfinkel
June 1997
OUT OF PRINT

Practical UNIX and Internet Security Practical UNIX and Internet Security
by Simson Garfinkel, Gene Spafford
Second Edition April 1996
OUT OF PRINT

Practical UNIX Security Practical UNIX Security
by Simson Garfinkel, Gene Spafford
June 1991
OUT OF PRINT

Gene blogs at:

Four short links: 25 May 2015

May 25 2015

Why Are Eight Bits Enough for Deep Neural Networks? (Pete Warden) — It turns out that neural networks are different. You can run them with eight-bit parameters and intermediate buffers, and suffer no noticeable loss in the final results. This … read more

Four short links: 25 May 2015

May 25 2015

Why Are Eight Bits Enough for Deep Neural Networks? (Pete Warden) — It turns out that neural networks are different. You can run them with eight-bit parameters and intermediate buffers, and suffer no noticeable loss in the final results. This … read more

Kyoto’s Nasty 22% City-Bike Hill Climb

May 24 2015

距離125mで高度上昇26m、22%の坂を頑張りました。 I went out for a long bike in the mountains of northern Kyoto on Saturday, and after 120km (75mi) of tough ups and pleasant downs with friends (that I'll write about separately), I made an attempt at a hill so steep that its name on Strava is "Nasty". It's… read more

Why are Eight Bits Enough for Deep Neural Networks?

May 23 2015

Picture by Retronator Deep learning is a very weird technology. It evolved over decades on a very different track than the mainstream of AI, kept alive by the efforts of a handful of believers. When I started using it a few years ago, it reminded me of the first time… read more

Algocracy

May 23 2015

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