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Violent Python

A Cookbook for Hackers, Forensic Analysts, Penetration Testers and Security Engineers

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Description

Violent Python shows you how to move from a theoretical understanding of offensive computing concepts to a practical implementation. Instead of relying on another attacker’s tools, this book will teach you to forge your own weapons using the Python programming language. This book demonstrates how to write Python scripts to automate large-scale network attacks, extract metadata, and investigate forensic artifacts. It also shows how to write code to intercept and analyze network traffic using Python, craft and spoof wireless frames to attack wireless and Bluetooth devices, and how to data-mine popular social media websites and evade modern anti-virus.



- Demonstrates how to write Python scripts to automate large-scale network attacks, extract metadata, and investigate forensic artifacts.

- Write code to intercept and analyze network traffic using Python. Craft and spoof wireless frames to attack wireless and Bluetooth devices.

- Data-mine popular social media websites and evade modern anti-virus.

Reviews

On Dec 24 Wayne Werner wrote: Good hacking, Python code really was violent
Violent Python, by TJ O'Connor, published by Elsevier / Syngress, is a fantastic concept coupled with some really terrible Python code. When I initially picked up this book I was incredibly excited, because who doesn't want to learn about hacking and computer security? Full Review  >

Rating: StarStarStarStarStar3.0

On Oct 4 Ninajean Slone wrote: A good book, I'm adding it to my forensics library
I enjoy reading books about how to do things, and what makes them tick. I think this book covers a lot of ground on how to hack websites. As they say, to catch a criminal, it helps to have a criminal mind. That would also apply to hackers. We’re all curious, and whether we admit it or not, we really don’t like locks because we want to know what is in the room which is being locked. In the book, “1984”, there was a room that people really did not want to go into although no one would actually say what was in it. It was your worst nightmare, the thing you feared the most. As we all know, fear is a personal thing. So room 19 wouldn’t hold for you what I was afraid of, but rather what you are afraid of. It’s a little like that as far as hackers go. There are different types of hackers, white-hat, gray-hat, black-hat, etc. Not all of them are going to steal your information and either use it or, God forbid, sell it. But for the ones who do, it’s better to cya (cover your ass) than to be like the proverbial ostrich and stick our head in the sand. Full Review  >

Rating: StarStarStarStarStar4.0

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