O'Reilly logo

20/20: 20 Great Lists by 20 Outstanding Business Thinkers by Diana Renner, Steven D’Souza

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

1.A REFRAMING OF NOT KNOWING

When we first shared the idea of a book on Not Knowing with people, the feedback tended to be negative:

“What’s good about not knowing things?”

“I don’t see any benefit in ignorance”

“I’d prefer to know people than not know them”

“Not knowing means I’m vulnerable, I can get cheated on if I’m naive”

“Why would I want to look illiterate, a buffoon in front of others?”

“I’m lost enough as it is, why would I want to get more lost?”

It follows that if knowing is good, then its opposite is bad. It’s a simple matter of logic for most people. But when we use the term Not Knowing we aren’t talking about the common view of those two words, but rather the ancient “apophatic tradition” used to describe what something was “not” ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required