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3D Displays by Ernst Lueder

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Introduction

The design and manufacture of displays are now mature enough to introduce three-dimensional (3D) displays into the marketplace. This happened first with displays for mobile devices in the form of near-to-the-eye displays, but home TV will follow suit.

This book covers five approaches to realize 3D perception, namely, stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays, integral imaging, holography, and volumetric displays.

The intention guiding the book is to promote a well-founded understanding of the electro-optic effects of 3D systems and of the addressing circuits. Equations are as a rule not simply stated but are derived, or, if not fully done so, at least hints for the derivation are given. An example of this concept is the explanation of the basics of holography by phasors, which will be outlined, but which are also known from electrical engineering or from the Jones vector. This renders complex facts associated with holograms easier to understand.

Emphasis is placed on stereoscopic and autostereoscopic displays as they are closest to being commercialized. The basic components of stereoscopic displays are patterned retarders and to a lesser degree wire grid polarizers. Autostereoscopic displays rely on beam splitters, lenticular lenses, parallax barriers, light guides and various types of 3D films. All of these elements are explained in detail.

The glasses required for stereoscopic displays distinguish between the left and the right eye views either by shutters or by ...

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