147
37
Selecting a
Team Problem
PURPOSE:
1. To teach a team or team leaders the factors that should be
considered in selecting a problem to be solved.
2. To teach a team or team leaders a process for deciding which
problem the team should try to solve.
GROUP SIZE:
Works best with a team of 4 to 12 people or in a team training
workshop of up to 20 people.
TIME:
1 to 2 hours
PHYSICAL
SETTING:
With a team, a round or rectangular table and chairs. In a training
workshop, groups of tables and chairs spread out around the room.
MATERIALS:
1. A copy of the Problem Selection Worksheet and Rating Scales for
each person.
2. Easel, flipchart, and markers.
PROCESS:
1. This activity takes place after the team has brainstormed or in
some other way generated a list of problems.
2. Distribute a copy of the Problem Selection Worksheet to each
person. Tell the team to write a brief description of the problem in
the left column of the worksheet. Review the directions on the
worksheet. If necessary, review what is meant by each of the
factors across the top of the worksheet.
3. Post the totals for each problem on a flipchart. Lead a discussion
on each of the problems by focusing on the relative importance of
each of the factors.
4. Move the discussion to a consensus on one of the problems.
Suggest that the next step is the creation of a clear problem
statement. See Activity 11, The Car Case, for an exercise on
writing problem statements.
50 Activities for Team Building
149
Total
Projected
ROI
Time
Easy/
Hard
Important/
Unimportant
Under/Not
Under Team’s
Control
Problem Selection Worksheet
Problem
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
50 Activities for Team Building
151
No expected payoff
for effort required.
Some expected
payoff for effort
required.
Considerable
expected payoff for
effort required.
Great expected
benefit for effort
required.
Projected Return on
Investment (ROI)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Over 6 months
3 to 6 months
1 to 2 months
Less than 1 month
Time
1.
2.
3.
4.
Possible, but very
hard to solve.
Will take considerable
time and effort.
Will take some time
and effort.
Really easy to solve.
Easy/
Hard
1.
2.
3.
4.
If relevant, it’s not
obvious.
Might have some
importance for our
area.
Has considerable
importance for our
area.
Extremely important.
Important/
Unimportant
1.
2.
3.
4.
Our team has no
control over this
problem.
Our team has some
control over this
problem.
Our team has
considerable control
over this problem.
Our team has almost
complete control over
this problem.
Rating Scales
Under/Not Under
Control
1.
2.
3.
4.
DIRECTIONS:
1. In each of the five categories listed above, determine an appropriate score for each problem being considered.
2. Develop a total team score for each problem by adding together all of your five individual scores. (Place this total
score in the column at the far right of the page.)
3. Develop a total team score for each problem to determine a team ranking for all problems.
4. Using this ranking process as a guide, discuss reasons for specific ratings, then finalize a potential problem to work
on.

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