The Load-In and Focus Packet
253
C
L
7'
9'
14'
18'
UC
PORTAL L
1 LEG L
2 LEG L
3 LEG L
4 LEG L
PORTAL R
1 LEG R
2 LEG R
3 LEG R
4 LEG R
7'
9'
FRONT ZONE 1
3'
10'
13'-10"
7' R14' R 7' L 14' L
FRONT ZONE 2
CENTER CENTER
FRONT ZONE 3/DOWN ZONE 2
DSR 1/4 DSL 1/4DC
16'
USR 1/4 USL 1/4
DOWN ZONE 1
8'-6"
BACK ZONE 1
BACK ZONE 2
5'-6"
18'
25'-2"
14'
18'
CENTER
14'
20'
26'
8' 2'
Figure 8.27 The Hokey Master Focus Point Groundplan
ready to be used during load-in to rapidly spike the
stage for the focus session.
Focus Charts
Once the reference grid of focus point groundplans is
established, it becomes a communication framework
that defines the location of any light beam focused
within its boundaries (in 2, 14 Right, for example).
The focus points can then be written on a reference
document that will provide this information to the
lighting designer during the focus session. This docu-
ment may be altered versions of other paperwork, or
it may be a unique document the lighting designer has
in hand. Since the lighting designer typically moves
around the stage establishing the focus points, regard-
less of what is used as a reference document, it needs
to be compact, easy to read, and provide the ability
to quickly cross-reference to other hanging positions
in the light plot.
Since the focus session typically proceeds sequen-
tially through each hanging position, some designers
merely use a copy of the instrument schedule. This
is often the focus document used if the designer can
quickly understand the focus point location by trans-
lating the written indication in the “purpose” col-
umn, or its equivalent. Reading “Warm Area 5” as a
purpose, for example, might be processed internally
like this: (Area 5, that would be the first zone, 14-0
left of center. Move!).
If the lighting designer is more comfortable see-
ing a graphic layout, the focus document may be the
light plot. Some designers prefer the light plot because
it’s visually simpler to compare the focus between two
instruments from the same system in different zones.
If the lighting designer’s familiar with the plot and has
the focus firmly in mind, he or she may merely make
shorthand notes for specials. If the focus involves
extensive scenery or numerous scenes, every note nec-
essary to point and shape each light may be handwrit-
ten directly on the map. Doing so attempts to eliminate
any need to refer to other paperwork. Depending on
the complexity and scale size of the drawing, how-
ever, it may be difficult to handwrite or read all of the
information so that it can easily be seen.
Figure 8.28 shows the stage left half of the FOH
truss from the Hokey light plot with focus notes indi-
cated above each instrument. Using the light plot

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