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Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling

Book Description

Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling presents new information on the growing concerns about climate change, the security of energy supplies, and the ongoing interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy sources.

The amount of energy used for heating and cooling is very significant, estimated, for example, as half of final energy consumption in Europe. Solar thermal installations have the potential to meet a large proportion of the heating and cooling needs of both buildings and industry and the number of solar thermal installations is increasing rapidly. This book provides an authoritative review of the latest research in solar heating and cooling technologies and applications.

  • Provides researchers in academia and industry with an authoritative overview of heating and cooling for buildings and industry in one convenient volume
  • Part III, ‘Solar cooling technologies’ is contributed by authors from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, which is a world-leader in this area
  • Covers advanced applications from zero-energy buildings, through industrial process heat to district heating and cooling

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Related titles
  5. Copyright
  6. List of contributors
  7. Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy
  8. Part One. Introduction
    1. 1. Introduction to solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 1.1. Background
      2. 1.2. Overview of solar heating and cooling systems
      3. 1.3. Technology roadmap
    2. 2. Resource assessment and site selection for solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 2.1. Introduction
      2. 2.2. Definition of solar resources
      3. 2.3. Relationship between solar resources and solar collectors
      4. 2.4. Measuring and modeling the solar resource
      5. 2.5. Solar resource data sets important to siting and sizing solar heating and cooling (SHC) technologies
      6. 2.6. Sources of solar resource information
      7. 2.7. Summary
    3. 3. Energy efficiency and environmental impact of solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.2. Energy use in the built environment
      3. 3.3. Worldwide market penetration of solar heating and cooling systems
      4. 3.4. Overview of technologies used for solar heating and cooling systems and their efficiency
      5. 3.5. Environmental impact of solar heating and cooling systems
      6. 3.6. Conclusions
  9. Part Two. Solar heating systems
    1. 4. Nontracking solar collection technologies for solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.2. Flat plate collectors
      3. 4.3. Flat plate collectors with diffuse reflectors
      4. 4.4. Compound parabolic collectors
      5. 4.5. Reverse flat plate collectors
      6. 4.6. Evacuated tube collectors
      7. 4.7. Conclusions
      8. Glossary
    2. 5. Tracking solar collection technologies for solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 5.1. Definition of solar tracking technology
      2. 5.2. Classification and features
      3. 5.3. Control system
      4. 5.4. Practical examples
    3. 6. Passive solar space heating
      1. 6.1. Introduction
      2. 6.2. Sun and built forms
      3. 6.3. Passive solar heating systems materials and components
      4. 6.4. Passive solar heating systems technologies
      5. 6.5. Economics and energy efficiency of passive solar heating systems
      6. 6.6. Passive solar heating systems at high latitudes: a case study
      7. 6.7. Conclusions and future trends
    4. 7. Innovations in passive solar water heating systems
      1. 7.1. Introduction
      2. 7.2. Flat plate collector–thermosiphon
      3. 7.3. Evacuated tube collector
      4. 7.4. Integrated collector storage systems and compound parabolic collectors
      5. 7.5. Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal collector
      6. 7.6. Conclusion and future trends
      7. Nomenclature
      8. Subscripts
      9. Greek letters
    5. 8. Active solar space heating
      1. 8.1. Background on active space heating
      2. 8.2. Operation of active solar space heating systems
      3. 8.3. Solar hybrid systems
      4. 8.4. Energy efficiency of active solar space heating
    6. 9. Active solar water heating systems
      1. 9.1. History
      2. 9.2. Overview of technologies for active solar water heating systems
      3. 9.3. Economics and energy efficiency of active solar water heating systems
      4. 9.4. Applications of active solar water heating systems: case study
      5. 9.5. Conclusions and future trends
  10. Part Three. Solar cooling technologies
    1. 10. Photovoltaic-powered solar cooling systems
      1. 10.1. Introduction
      2. 10.2. Performance index
      3. 10.3. Photovoltaic-powered refrigeration system
      4. 10.4. Photovoltaic-powered air-conditioning system
      5. 10.5. Conclusions
    2. 11. Solar-powered absorption cooling systems
      1. 11.1. Overview
      2. 11.2. Low-temperature solar power-driven systems
      3. 11.3. Medium-temperature solar power-driven systems
      4. 11.4. Drawbacks of solar absorption cooling systems and improvement
      5. 11.5. Economic performance and adaptability analysis
      6. 11.6. Summary
    3. 12. Solar-powered adsorption cooling systems
      1. 12.1. Introduction
      2. 12.2. Low-temperature solar-powered adsorption systems
      3. 12.3. Medium-temperature solar-powered adsorption systems
      4. 12.4. Summary
    4. 13. Review of solar-powered desiccant cooling systems
      1. 13.1. Solar-powered rotary desiccant wheel cooling system
      2. 13.2. Solar-powered liquid desiccant systems
      3. 13.3. Summary
    5. 14. Other types of solar-powered cooling systems
      1. 14.1. Introduction
      2. 14.2. Other types of solar-powered cooling systems
      3. 14.3. Conclusion
  11. Part Four. Heat storage for solar heating and coolingapplications
    1. 15. Sensible heat storage for solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 15.1. Introduction
      2. 15.2. Storage materials
      3. 15.3. Classification of sensible thermal energy storage systems
      4. 15.4. Working principle
      5. 15.5. Sensible thermal storage technologies
      6. 15.6. Thermal performance evaluations
      7. Nomenclature and symbols
    2. 16. Latent heat storage for solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 16.1. Introduction
      2. 16.2. Temperature level for latent heat storage design
      3. 16.3. Storage media
      4. 16.4. Main materials for storage (Pumpable slurries and PCM)
      5. 16.5. Examples
      6. 16.6. Conclusion
      7. List of symbols
      8. Greek symbols
      9. Subscripts
      10. Abbreviations
    3. 17. Chemisorption heat storage for solar low-energy buildings
      1. 17.1. Introduction
      2. 17.2. Basics of chemisorption
      3. 17.3. Important considerations concerning application to buildings
      4. 17.4. Chemical heat storage materials
      5. 17.5. Storage reactor developments
      6. 17.6. Conclusions
      7. List of symbols
      8. Greek letters
      9. Subscripts
      10. Superscript
    4. 18. Thermochemical heat storage for solar heating and cooling systems
      1. 18.1. Introduction
      2. 18.2. Thermochemical heat storage
      3. 18.3. Summary and perspective
  12. Part Five. Advanced applications of solar heatingand cooling systems
    1. 19. Combined photovoltaic/thermal technology for building applications
      1. 19.1. Introduction
      2. 19.2. Flat plate photovoltaic/thermal systems and equipment for building applications
      3. 19.3. Advanced system design and performance analysis
      4. 19.4. Final remarks
    2. 20. Future trends for solar energy use in nearly zero energy buildings
      1. 20.1. Renewables in the built environment
      2. 20.2. Solar energy potential for thermal energy production in the built environment
      3. 20.3. New trends in increasing the use of solar energy conversion systems integrated in nearly zero energy buildings
      4. 20.4. Instead of conclusions
  13. Index