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AppleScript: The Missing Manual by Adam Goldstein

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Setting Script Editor's Preferences

Now that you've been using Script Editor for a little while, the boring text coloring is probably starting to get to you. Or maybe you're just sick of reading your scripts in a 12-point font. No matter what your complaint, chances are Script Editor can make things better for you.

Start out by opening Script Editor Preferences (

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-,). You'll see five buttons in the toolbar, each for a different aspect of Script Editor's behavior. Click the category you want to customize (Figure 2-8), and continue reading.

Script Editor's Preferences window. Click a toolbar button to jump right to that particular pane.

Figure 2-8. Script Editor's Preferences window. Click a toolbar button to jump right to that particular pane.

General

Fresh out of the box, your Mac comes with only one language you can use in Script Editor: AppleScript. That's why Script Editor automatically understands your AppleScript commands when you create a new script and click Run.

However, some people install other programming languages—like JavaScript—for use in Script Editor (Sidebar 3.2), and that's where the Default Language pop-up menu comes in. With this menu, you can select what language you want to use for all new scripts. (If you ever want to override this setting for a single script, just use the Navigation Bar [Sidebar 2.4].)

Editing

The three sections of the Editing pane allow you ...

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