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Business Analysis Techniques by Paul Turner, Debra Paul, James Cadle

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LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES
Figure 1.1 Porter’s Five Forces framework 6
Figure 1.2 Resource Audit 11
Figure 1.3 The Boston Box 13
Figure 1.4 SWOT analysis 14
Figure 1.5 Ansoff’s matrix 16
Figure 1.6 The McKinsey 7-S model 18
Figure 1.7 The four-view model 20
Figure 1.8 Balanced Business Scorecard 23
Figure 2.1 The main stages of interviewing 26
Figure 2.2 The structure of an interview 27
Figure 2.3 Workshop process 30
Figure 2.4 The elements of a questionnaire 43
Figure 2.5 Activity sampling sheet (completed) 47
Figure 2.6 Sampling analysis summary sheet 48
Figure 2.7 Special-purpose record for complaints handling 50
Figure 2.8 Detailed weekly timesheet 51
Figure 2.9 Example of a document specification form 52
Figure 2.10 Example rich picture (of a sales organisation) 54
Figure 2.11 Example of a mind map 56
Figure 2.12 Context diagram 58
Figure 3.1 The stakeholder wheel 65
Figure 3.2 Power/interest grid 67
Figure 3.3 Extended power/interest grid 68
Figure 3.4 Business Activity Model for a high-street clothing retailer 78
Figure 3.5 RASCI chart 79
Figure 3.6 Thomas–Kilmann conflict mode instrument 85
Figure 4.1 Systemic analysis approach 91
Figure 4.2 Types of value proposition 94
Figure 4.3 Porter’s value chain 95
Figure 4.4 Partial value chain of primary activities example 97
Figure 4.5 Value chain for an examination body 98
Figure 4.6 Organisation Diagram showing external environment 99
Figure 4.7 Completed Organisation Diagram 100
Figure 4.8 Context diagram supporting event identification 103
Figure 4.9 Business process notation set 106
Figure 4.10 Business process model with detailed steps 109
Figure 4.11 Business process model showing rationalised steps 109
Figure 4.12 Decision table structure 113
Figure 4.13 Example decision tree 117
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LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES
Figure 5.1 The process for evaluating options 123
Figure 5.2 Options identification 125
Figure 5.3 Shortlisting options 126
Figure 5.4 Incremental options 127
Figure 5.5 Elements of feasibility 128
Figure 5.6 Force-field analysis 132
Figure 5.7 Types of cost and benefit 134
Figure 6.1 Storyboard for a travel agent 166
Figure 6.2 Hothousing process 173
Figure 6.3 Outer and inner timeboxes 174
Figure 6.4 Example of the structure of a typical timebox 177
Figure 6.5 Example requirements catalogue entry 189
Figure 6.6 Links between requirements and other development elements 204
Figure 6.7 Basic elements of a use case diagram 206
Figure 6.8 Additional use case notation 207
Figure 6.9 Use case description for Assign resources 210
Figure 6.10 Examples of entities 212
Figure 6.11 One-to-many relationship between entities 212
Figure 6.12 Optional relationship 213
Figure 6.13 Many-to-many relationship 213
Figure 6.14 Resolved many-to-many relationship 213
Figure 6.15 Extended data model 214
Figure 6.16 Recursive relationship 214
Figure 6.17 Many-to-many recursive relationship 215
Figure 6.18 Exclusive relationship 215
Figure 6.19 Separated exclusive relationship 216
Figure 6.20 Named relationships 216
Figure 6.21 Subtypes and super-types 217
Figure 6.22 Example entity relationship model 218
Figure 6.23 Partial library model 218
Figure 6.24 An object class 220
Figure 6.25 Association between classes 221
Figure 6.26 Association class 222
Figure 6.27 Additional linked classes 223
Figure 6.28 Reflexive relationship 223
Figure 6.29 Generalisation 224
Figure 6.30 Example class model 225
Figure 7.1 Johnson and Scholess cultural web 233
Figure 7.2 Kurt Lewin’s model of organisational change 236
Figure 7.3 The SARAH model of change 238
Figure 7.4 Kolbs learning cycle 240
Figure 7.5 Honey and Mumford’s learning styles 241
Figure 7.6 Conscious competence model 243
Figure 7.7 Benefits map 245
Figure 7.8 Bar chart showing changes and benefits against timeline 246
Figure 7.9 Benefits realisation approach 249
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