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Business Analysis Techniques by Paul Turner, Debra Paul, James Cadle

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CONSIDER PERSPECTIVES
One of the key aspects of stakeholder relationship management is to recognise
that all stakeholders are individual people. As the saying goes, ‘people buy from
people’, and this applies to messages and information as well as products or
services. Stakeholders are not automatons who will always behave in a
predictable manner and can be treated in a generic fashion. If we want to work
effectively with them we need to begin by recognising that they are individuals,
and aiming to view situations from their perspectives. The CATWOE technique
helps us understand the stakeholders perspectives their view of the area that is
under investigation. Some time spent thinking about what stakeholders value in
a situation, and considering their priorities, can provide excellent insights into
how they need to be approached, what information they require and which
concerns should be taken into account.
CATWOE, supp
orted by the other stakeholder analysis techniques, is used to
develop a diagrammatic view the BAM. The business activity modelling
technique can be difficult to apply in practice, since it requires BAs to ‘step back’
from the existing situation and model what the perspective indicates ought to be
happening in the organisation, rather than what is actually happening. There is
also a tendency to model activities at too low a level for example, by having
three activities called sell over telephone’, ‘sell over internet’ and ‘sell face to face’,
where, probably, just sell goods’ would be more correct. Sometimes there is a
need to split activities in this way, but usually it is better to work at a higher
level of aggregation. Another problem is that practitioners can confuse this
approach with building process models. As we have explained, the BAM shows
what is going on, whereas a process model explores how. It can sometimes be
useful, however, to ‘drill down inside an activity on a BAM, using a process model
in order to understand why the activity is not satisfactory at the moment.
This set of techniques supports various aspects of stakeholder analysis.
They are particularly effective at the following points during business analysis
projects:
when investigating business situations and analysing issues and problems;
when analysing value propositions for internal and external customers;
when building conceptual activity or process models;
when identifying and negotiating conflicts;
when carrying out gap analysis;
when producing business cases and considering the options and how to
encourage ‘buy in’.
STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT
Technique 30: Stakeholder management planning
Variants/Aliases
Another term used in this context is stakeholder map.
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BUSINESS ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES
Description of the technique
The stakeholder analysis work contributes to the ongoing management of
stakeholders during a project. A stakeholder management plan provides a means
of capturing all of the information, and setting out the actions to be taken with
regard to each stakeholder. The plan consists of an assessment for each one, and
the areas to be included in each assessment are as follows:
Name of
stakeholder:
the name and possibly the job title of the stakeholder;
Current level
of power or
inuence:
an assessment of whether the stakeholders power
is low, medium or high (from the power/interest grid);
Current level
of interest:
an assessment of whether the stakeholders interest is low,
medium or high (from the power/interest grid);
Issues and
interests:
a summary of the major issues of concern to the stakeholder,
and the areas of particular interest, possibly also including a
list of the priorities, values and beliefs identified during
CATWOE analysis;
Current
attitude:
an assessment of the stakeholders attitude towards the
project, possibly standardised using a classification scheme,
such as:
Champion or Advocate: a stakeholder who will promote
the project actively;
Supporter or Fo
llower: a stakeholder who supports the
project but will not be particularly active in promoting it;
Neutral or Ind
ifferent: a stakeholder who is not
particularly in favour of or against the project;
Critic: a stakeholder wh
o is not in favour of the project
but will not work actively against it;
Opponent: a sta
keholder who will work actively to oppose
the project and impede progress likely to have a
personal agenda resulting from perceived negative
impact of the project;
Blocker: a sta
keholder who opposes the project, typically
because of reasons unconnected with it.
Desired support: assessment of the contribution that the stakeholder could
provide to the project;
Desired role: the role and responsibilities that the stakeholder could
perform for the project an assessment that might be
linked to the RASCI chart;
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