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Business Analysis Techniques by Paul Turner, Debra Paul, James Cadle

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EVALUATE OPTIONS
Present the Now the main issues found should be presented succinctly using
issues and the minimum number of slides. Detail is not needed on the slides,
solutions: but presenters should have it at their ngertips so as to be able
to field questions.
E
nd on At the end of the presentation summarise the issues, and clearly
a high: restate the decision the managers are being invited to make.
Practical points about presenting business cases
The reason why you are being invited to present your ideas in person is probably
that the decision-makers want to hear what you have to say, and to have the
arguments summarised. So it is a mistake to turn up and, in effect, simply read
the report to them!
Another error is to take along too many slides, so that the complaint of ‘death by
PowerPoint’ is made. If, say, 15 minutes is available for the presentation, that
implies a maximum of five slides if sufficient time is to be spent speaking to each
of them. Those slides should not be endless sets of bullet points, since it is very
difficult not to just read these to the audience. Instead they should contain the
main points of the presentation, and present, in pictures, things that are difficult
to explain in words such as the shape of a new organisation chart, the
configuration of a network, or a bar chart showing expected increased sales.
One way of improving the chances of staging a successful presentation is to hold
rehearsals. At its simplest this could involve delivering the presentation a few
times to the mirror, but by far the best idea is to have a fuller practice session,
with colleagues taking the roles of the real audience and asking difficult
questions at various points. That way, the presenter gets experience of handling
these situations, and is much more relaxed, comfortable and confident when the
real thing comes around.
REFERENCES
Bradley, G. (2006) Benefit Realisation Management: A Practical Guide to
Achieving Benefits Through Change. Gower Publishing, Aldershot.
Ward, J. and Daniel, E. (2006) Benefits Management: Delivering Value from IS
and IT Investments. Wiley, Chichester.
Welch, J. and Welch, S. (2005) Winning. HarperCollins, New York.
FURTHER READING
Blackstaff, M. (2006) Finance for IT Decision Makers, 2nd edition. British
Computer Society, Swindon.
Cadle, J. and Yeates, D. (2008) Project Management for Information Systems,
5th edition. FT Prentice Hall, Harlow.
155
BUSINESS ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES
Gambles, I. (2009) Making the Business Case: Proposals that Succeed for Projects
that Work. Gower, Farnham.
Jay, R. (2003) How to Write Proposals and Reports that Get Results, Financial
Times/Prentice Hall, Harlow.
Jay, R. and Jay, A. (2004) Effective Presentation. 3rd edition, Prentice Hall
Business, Harlow.
Lucey, T. (2003) Management Accounting, 2nd edition. Thomson Learning,
London.
Schmidt, M.J. (2002) The Business Case Guide, 2nd edition. Solution Matrix,
Boston.
156

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