O'Reilly logo

Cloud Computing by James F. Ransome, John W. Rittinghouse

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

235
Chapter 9
Mobile Internet Devices
and the Cloud
9.1 Chapter Overview
A December 2008 Informa Telecoms & Media study
1
estimated that there
are over 4 billion connections to mobile devices worldwide—an astounding
number when you realize that this figure represents 60% of the global pop-
ulation today. Of course, this does not mean that two out of every three
people on Earth have a mobile phone. It is common in more than 60 coun-
tries, however, for one person to have two or more devices, even while there
are no phones at all in some parts of the globe. In some countries, millions
of people are now experiencing connectivity to the world for the first time
through wireless technologies. It is changing their economic, social, and
political fortunes forevermore.
The number of wireless users on 3G services continues to rise daily.
Informa estimates that there are nearly 415 million 3G subscriptions to
date, with 77% share of the 3G market on UMTS/HSPA1 networks or 320
million connections, and the remaining 95 million subscribed to the older
CDMA EV-DO2 technology. The number of commercial UMTS/HSPA
networks has risen to 258 in more than 100 countries, including 41 net-
works in 20 countries in the Latin America and Caribbean region. It is a
foregone conclusion that HSPA and HSPA+3 will compete with all prevail-
ing mobile wireless technologies available today. Telstras recent commercial
launch of HSPA+,reports peak theoretical downlink speeds of 21.6 Mbps.
The 3G technology is more than capable of delivering the high-speed band-
width that customers demand.
2
If the cloud is becoming increasingly pervasive and mobile browsers are
getting better every day, you may be asking yourself if you need anything
1. http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc_id=169641.
2. http://www.unstrung.com/document.asp?doc_id=169641.
Chap9.fm Page 235 Friday, May 22, 2009 11:28 AM
236 Cloud Computing
more on your mobile device beyond a browser that can access the cloud.
Can browser widgets provide enough functionality that you dont need
applications on your device? What if you could get everything you need
accomplished using simple widgets that leverage your mobile device-based
browser to access the cloud? The potential impact on enterprise mobility is
huge. While organizations are deploying more and more Software-as-a-Ser-
vice (SaaS) applications, there is no reason mobile workers cant access those
applications from their mobile devices, assuming they have enough band-
width (i.e., 3G- or 4G-capable devices). All that is really required beyond
such bandwidth is a browser that can actually handle all of the various SaaS-
associated web standards. Imagine a future environment in which mobile
device manufacturers will partner with multiple SaaS vendors to provide
enterprises complete cloud-based computing solutions that work anywhere.
9.2 What Is a Smartphone?
The definition of a smartphone is not standardized and varies depending on
who you ask. For most users, the consensus is that a smartphone is a mobile
device that offers advanced capabilities beyond those offered by a typical
mobile phone. Modern versions come with PC-like functionality. Many of
the newer models have customized operating systems and associated soft-
ware that provides a standardized interface. Nearly all smartphones have
advanced features such as email, Internet access, instant messaging, etc.
Smartphones are much more than just another cell phone. They provide
instant access to the web, which translates into immediate collaboration
capability. Whether you are researching financial news to predict the stock
market or looking for the perfect golf course to treat your client, it’s on the
Internet. Most smartphones allow you to sync data with your desktop com-
puter. You can store and work on documents from your smartphone, and
you can receive and reply to emails as they arrive in your inbox using real-
time push email.
Smartphone applications may be developed by the manufacturer of the
device or by any other third-party provider or developer capable of accessing
the open source operating system. Other functionalities might include an
additional interface such as a miniature QWERTY keyboard on the touch
screen, built-in video and camera features, contact management, built-in
navigation software, office document processing capability, and software for
playing music and viewing video clips. Such smartphone capabilities trans-
form the common cell phone into a mobile multimedia platform for your
Chap9.fm Page 236 Friday, May 22, 2009 11:28 AM

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required