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CompTIA® Linux+ Certification, Powered by LPI, Student Manual by Axzo Press

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18 CompTIA Linux+ Certification, Powered by LPI
Topic B: Installing Linux
This topic covers the following CompTIA exam objectives for Linux+ [Powered by
LPI] Certification, LX0-101 and LX0-102 exams.
# Objective
102.1 Design hard disk layout
Allocate filesystems and swap space to separate partitions or disks
Tailor the design to the intended user of the system
Ensure the /boot partition conforms to the hardware architecture required for booting
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms, and utilities:
/ (root) filesystem
/var filesystem
/home filesystem
swap space
mount points
partitions
102.2 Install a boot manager
Install and configure a boot loaders, such as GRUB
Pre-installation
Explanation
Before you can install Linux, you generally perform the following tasks:
Select the installation type.
Download the appropriate installation files.
If necessary, burn an ISO image to disc.
Installing and using Linux 19
Installation types
To install Linux, you need the installation files. Depending on the installation type, this
set of files might comprise a set of DVD discs containing every possible application and
package supported by the distro. Or it might include just the minimal files needed to
boot your PC, connect to the Internet, and download the files required to run your distro.
The following table describes the primary installation types you must choose from.
Install type With this option
CD/DVD media You purchase or receive CD or DVD media and install in much the
same way you’d install any retail software application.
ISO file You download an “image” of a CD or DVD. Using disc burning
software, you create your own CD or DVD installation media and then
install using those discs. ISO files are large, typically 700 MB per CD
and multiple gigabytes for DVD images.
Installable live CD You download an ISO file, burn a disc, and then boot. Unlike the plain
ISO file install option, a live CD provides a fully working Linux
environment. You don’t actually have to install anything to run Linux,
provided you have an available hard drive on which to store your files
(the live CD is unwritable). Installable live CDs include programs that
you can use to truly install Linux onto your computer.
Netinst You download a small bootable file, which you store on a USB drive,
an optical disc, or even a floppy drive. You boot using that medium, at
which point the installation begins. All of the remaining files needed to
install Linux on your computer are downloaded from the Internet,
typically over an HTTP or FTP connection.
NFS The Network File System is a means of file sharing across the network
akin to Windows shares. With this installation method, you connect to a
network drive that contains your Linux installation files and load the
installer from there.
Installation files
Most Linux distros are available for multiple hardware platforms. Additionally, many
are available in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions. In general, you should choose the
installation file set that most closely matches your hardware.
For most distros, all Intel-compatible platforms are supported through a single release.
This means that you use the same file whether you’re running an Intel Pentium or an
AMD clone system. You see such download files identified with abbreviations such as
x86, i386, i686, and so forth. 32-bit and 64-bit versions are typically be identified with a
suffix: for example, x86_32 or x86_64.
In some cases, a distro takes advantage of specific CPU optimizations; thus you see
processor-specific downloads. For example, you might see an AMD-specific version
identified by the abbreviation amd64.
In most cases, you can run a 32-bit version on a 64-bit CPU. The reverse isn’t true,
however. You get the best performance and optimized feature set by using the exact
version for your platform (in other words, use the 64-bit version on a 64-bit platform,
whenever possible).

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