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CompTIA® Linux+ Certification, Powered by LPI, Student Manual by Axzo Press

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Process and module management 821
Topic C: Kernel modules
This topic covers the following CompTIA exam objectives for Linux+ [Powered by
LPI] Certification, LX0-101 and LX0-102 exams.
# Objective
101.1 Determine and configure hardware settings
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms, and utilities:
/sys
/proc
modprobe
lsmod
103.1 Work on the command line
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms, and utilities:
uname
Kernel information
Explanation
The kernel is the core component of the Linux operating system. It performs the most
basic, or central, system functions, such as managing the interactions between hardware
components and starting other processes. The kernel exists as a layer of software
between user-space applications and the CPU, memory, and other hardware of your
computer.
All operating systems have a kernel, though they vary in detail. The Windows kernel is
not the same as the Linux kernel, which is not the same as the Macintosh OS X kernel.
Other than version differences, most Linux distributions use the same kernel.
Sometimes the distribution authors choose different kernel options when compiling the
kernel for use with their distro. Thus, even though Fedora and Ubuntu might use the
same kernel, the two operating systems might operate slightly differently at their core.
(The primary difference between distros is the selection of user-space utilities they
include.)
Kernel information
You can determine information about your kernel by using various commands. You can
also examine the files in the /sys and /proc directories, as each of those contains files
representing the kernel, modules, and other components of your computer.
With the
uname command, you can get data about your kernel, including its name,
version, and hardware architecture information. The command provides various options,
of which the
-a (show all) option is probably the most useful.
You can also use the cat command to view the contents of the files in the /proc or /sys
directory. For example, entering
cat /proc/version displays most of the same
information as you get with the
uname -a command.

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