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Computing with C# and the .NET Framework, 2nd Edition by Gittleman

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A Binary and Hexadecimal Numbers

Our familiar decimal number system uses ten digits, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, to represent numbers. We can only represent numbers up to nine with one digit. To write the number ten, we use two digits, 10, with the idea that the one in the ten's place represents ten. The number 387 represents 3 × 100 + 8 × 10 + 7 because the three is in the hundred's place, and the eight is in the ten's place. We call this the base ten system because each place represents a power of ten. The unit's place is 100 = 1, the ten's place is 101 = 10, the hundred's place is 102 = 100, and so on.

In the binary number system we use two digits, 0 and 1, to represent integers. This is particularly suitable for computers in which ...

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