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Construction for Landscape Architecture by Jamie Liversedge, Robert Holden

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Loads and reactions

Consider the example of a book on a table:

Live load is the load of the book on the table, and may be removed or replaced. In landscape construction, illustrations of such live loads on a structure include wind, water, and earth pressure, snow, and people or vehicles on a sidewalk or road;

Dead load is an immovable load, such as paint or varnish on a table. Being permanent, these are not removable—hence the term “dead.” Examples of dead loads include finishes and fittings, or fixed planters on a deck or patio;

Superimposed load is the live load and the dead load together: book and table (or car and road, for instance);

Self-weight is the weight of the structure itself, i.e. the weight of the table or the structure—e.g. a wall ...

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