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Construction for Landscape Architecture by Jamie Liversedge, Robert Holden

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Joints

The strength of lumber joints depends on:

  • the size of the glued area (if adhesives are used);
  • the way in which one piece of lumber encases the other; and
  • the accuracy of the joinery.

Note that end-grain lumber glues less well than lumber surfaces that run parallel with the wood grain.

The main types of lumber joint are:

  • angle or cross lumber joints, in which the two pieces of lumber join at an angle—e.g. mortice and tenon, lapped joints, dovetail joints, and comb joints;
  • widening joints, which widen a lumber board by adding a thin section parallel to it;
  • lengthening joints, which extend the length of a lumber member; and
  • hinge and “shutting” joints, which aim to form an air- or watertight seal.

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