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Construction for Landscape Architecture by Jamie Liversedge, Robert Holden

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Wrought iron

In popular usage, wrought iron denotes an iron that has been hammered under heat so as to improve its tensile strength. However, it was originally a purified iron, which had been reheated in order to remove the carbon. This was then hammered (a process called "puddling") and rolled in order to produce a fibrous or laminated structure with much greater tensile strength than gray cast iron, and with a better corrosion resistance than steel. Its carbon content is about 0.05 per cent. As such, it is suitable for bending and forging at low temperatures—and hence for wrought-iron fences, gates, balustrades, grills, hinges, and fixings. It is the traditional blacksmith’s iron, and indeed has been produced using charcoal since the Iron Age. ...

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