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Construction for Landscape Architecture by Jamie Liversedge, Robert Holden

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Lead

Cast-lead figurines, drainpipes, and cisterns in seventeenth-century gardens come to mind when thinking of lead in the garden, and it still is used for flashings and moisture-proof courses. It is easily melted, at 620.6ºF (lead musket balls were often made on the battlefield), but it is toxic. It is corrosion-resistant, because lead exposed to air forms a lead oxide film which stops further corrosion. Like copper, it is used in watertight flashings and cappings, and on roofs. Although dense and heavy, lead is extremely malleable because it has very little tensile strength. It is resistant to attack by most acids, and is not affected by most building materials. The exceptions are new cement mortar and tannin-rich lumbers such as oak and teak. ...

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