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Construction for Landscape Architecture by Jamie Liversedge, Robert Holden

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Soil reinforcement

This is a system of reinforcing the soil strength artificially, so that it can bear a greater load or resist slope erosion.

Typical methods include the following:

  • The addition of lime to clay or sticky, silt soils in order to make them more stable. Quicklime is hygroscopic—it absorbs moisture from the air—and therefore dries the soil so that construction vehicles can traffic over a construction site, and it can form a sub-base for road foundations. Note, however, that quicklimetreated soil can be very alkaline (with a pH of 12) and phytotoxic—so it should not be used in areas where it is intended to grow vegetation, and great care should be taken to ensure that dry lime dust does not blow around. Following the application ...

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