O'Reilly logo

Construction for Landscape Architecture by Jamie Liversedge, Robert Holden

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Edge restraint

Flexible roads require edge restraint so that they can be consolidated by rolling. Typically edge restraint can take the form of curbs which are haunched with concrete. Such curbs can take the form of precast concrete curbs, cast-in-place concrete (favoured in North America), bricks laid on edge or in soldier-course fashion, setts, or even steel edging. Private roads can be formed with timber edging, as can informal garden paths where the timber will rot away leaving a “natural” edge. Alternatively, on heavy clay soils newly laid flexible paving can be consolidated by rolling against a cut in the earth: this will produce a wavy edge which may be appropriate on rural sites.

Steel edging to a hoggin (bound gravel) path, Versailles, ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required