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Continuous Integration, Delivery, and Deployment by Sander Rossel

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Committing and pushing

Once you have staged the changes you want to commit, you can proceed with the actual commit. Committing your changes will write them to the history of your local project. Your changes are more or less cast in stone. You can commit as much as you like, but remember that a commit is only local. To actually push your work to the server so others can get it too, you must push your commits using the git push command. When you push your commits, three things can happen. First, your changes are pushed and everything is fine. Second, your changes are pushed, but others have also pushed changes to the same files resulting in a merge conflict that Git can resolve. Third, a merge conflict that Git cannot resolve requires you to ...

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