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CPM Scheduling for Construction: Best Practices and Guidelines

Book Description

The present edition, an SEI collaboration with the PMI Scheduling Community of Practice, provides readers with a reference guide that is like having an experienced scheduling professional at hand. The book itself is laid out in a way that follows the phases of building a project schedule: from project planning to project definition and schedule design, to development, maintenance, and usage of the schedule.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
  2. Title Page
  3. Copyright Page
  4. Table of Contents
  5. Introduction
    1. Scheduling Excellence Initiative Committee
  6. Organizational Structure of the Volume
  7. Section 1—Pre-Project Planning Phase
    1. 1.1. Selecting the Project Controls Team
      1. 1.1.1. Roles and Responsibilities
      2. 1.1.2. Evaluation of Capabilities
      3. 1.1.3. Team Formation
    2. 1.2. Preparing a Pre-Project Planning Outline
  8. Section 2—Schedule Design
    1. 2.1. Schedule Design Process Overview
    2. 2.2. Analytical Tools
    3. 2.3. Schedule Buy-In
    4. 2.4. Specification Requirements
    5. 2.5. Critical Path Method
      1. 2.5.1. Gantt Charts
      2. 2.5.2. CPM Organization Methods
      3. 2.5.3. Arrow Diagram and Precedence Diagram Schedules
    6. 2.6. Schedule Design and Management Plan
      1. 2.6.1. Design of Baselines
        1. 2.6.1.1. Initial Baseline Design
        2. 2.6.1.2. Detailed Baseline Design
        3. 2.6.1.3. Level of Detail
      2. 2.6.2. Documentation of Schedule Assumptions
      3. 2.6.3. Use of Multiple Schedules
      4. 2.6.4. Early Completion Schedules
        1. 2.6.4.1. Early Completion Schedules—Intentional
        2. 2.6.4.2. Early Completion Schedules—Inadvertent
      5. 2.6.5. Planning for Adverse Weather
        1. 2.6.5.1. Interpretation of Historical Weather Data
        2. 2.6.5.2. Methodology for Weather Planning
        3. 2.6.5.3. Accounting for Actual Weather
  9. Section 3—Schedule Development
    1. 3.1. Schedule Development Process Overview
    2. 3.2. Schedule Development Philosophy and Theory
      1. 3.2.1. Initial Baseline Development
      2. 3.2.2. Detailed Baseline Development
      3. 3.2.3. Initial and Detailed Baseline Review
      4. 3.2.4. Initial and Detailed Baseline Approval
      5. 3.2.5. Use of Narratives
    3. 3.3. Scope Definition
    4. 3.4. Schedule Structure
      1. 3.4.1. Work Breakdown Structure
      2. 3.4.2. Activity ID Coding
      3. 3.4.3. Activity Coding
      4. 3.4.4. Schedule Levels
      5. 3.4.5. Milestones
    5. 3.5. Activities
      1. 3.5.1. Activity Types
        1. 3.5.1.1. Tasks
        2. 3.5.1.2. Independent Activity
        3. 3.5.1.3. Hammock or Level of Effort (Summary) Activities
        4. 3.5.1.4. Milestones
      2. 3.5.2. Activity Coverage
        1. 3.5.2.1. Work Activities
        2. 3.5.2.2. Administrative Activities
        3. 3.5.2.3. Coordination Activities
    6. 3.6. Durations
      1. 3.6.1. Durations versus Update Frequency
      2. 3.6.2. Estimating and Duration Verification
      3. 3.6.3. Participation in Duration Review
    7. 3.7. Sequencing and Logic
      1. 3.7.1. Relationship Types
      2. 3.7.2. Driving Relationships
      3. 3.7.3. Use of Lags
      4. 3.7.4. Open-Ended Activities
      5. 3.7.5. Overlapping of Activities
      6. 3.7.6. Critical Path
    8. 3.8. Calendars
      1. 3.8.1. Use of Calendars
      2. 3.8.2. Planning Unit—Hour/Day/Week
      3. 3.8.3. Global Calendar
      4. 3.8.4. Workweek Calendars
      5. 3.8.5. Weather Calendars
      6. 3.8.6. Holiday Calendars
      7. 3.8.7. Resource Calendars
    9. 3.9. Constraints
      1. 3.9.1. Use of Constraints
      2. 3.9.2. Mandatory Constraints
      3. 3.9.3. Early Constraints
      4. 3.9.4. Late Constraints
      5. 3.9.5. Other Constraints
    10. 3.10. Software Considerations
      1. 3.10.1. Zero Free Float
      2. 3.10.2. Zero Total Float
      3. 3.10.3. Retained Logic versus Progress Override
      4. 3.10.4. Start Float versus Finish Float versus Most Critical Float
    11. 3.11. Resource-Loading
      1. 3.11.1. Resource Leveling
    12. 3.12. Risk Management Implementation
      1. 3.12.1. Risk Management Planning—Introduction to the Schedule
      2. 3.12.2. Identification of Risks
      3. 3.12.3. Qualitative Assessment
      4. 3.12.4. Risk Event Drivers
    13. 3.13. Schedule Finalization and Buy-In
      1. 3.13.1. Schedule Philosophy and Theory
      2. 3.13.2. Organizational Schedule Philosophy and Theory
    14. 3.14. Reporting Level of Detail
  10. Section 4—Schedule Maintenance
    1. 4.1. Schedule Maintenance Process Overview
      1. 4.1.1. Data Acquisition
      2. 4.1.2. Review of Durations and Sequences
      3. 4.1.3. Logic Changes
      4. 4.1.4. Revisions versus Routine Maintenance
      5. 4.1.5. Change Orders
      6. 4.1.6. Updating Resources in a Resource-Loaded Schedule
      7. 4.1.7. Updating Cost in a Cost-Loaded Schedule
      8. 4.1.8. Finalize the Update Status
    2. 4.2. Significance of the Schedule Update
    3. 4.3. Approval/Acceptance of the Update/Schedule Meetings
    4. 4.4. Progress Measurement and Recording
      1. 4.4.1. Extent of Scheduling Involvement
      2. 4.4.2. Timing of Updates
      3. 4.4.3. Data Capture and Verification
    5. 4.5. Adjusting and Revising Schedules
      1. 4.5.1. Review of Durations and Sequence
      2. 4.5.2. Keeping the Schedule Model Current
    6. 4.6. Baseline Management
      1. 4.6.1. Baseline Management—Recording and Documentation
      2. 4.6.2. Preservation
    7. 4.7. Documentation Purposes/Requirements
      1. 4.7.1. Documentation Purposes
      2. 4.7.2. Documentation Requirements
      3. 4.7.3. Documentation Distribution
      4. 4.7.4. Historical Data
      5. 4.7.5. Project Contract Documentation
  11. Section 5—Schedule Maintenance
    1. 5.1. Schedule Usage
      1. 5.1.2. Developing a Schedule Usage Process
    2. 5.2. Routine Schedule Analysis
      1. 5.2.1. Evaluation of Critical Paths
      2. 5.2.2. Re-Baselining
      3. 5.2.3. Use of Comparative Targets
      4. 5.2.4. Schedule Variance Analysis
      5. 5.2.5. Documentation of Logic Changes
    3. 5.3. Schedule Compliance Analysis
    4. 5.4. Schedule Reporting and Response
      1. 5.4.1. Schedule Communication Strategy
        1. 5.4.1.1. Project Stakeholders
        2. 5.4.1.2. Communication Strategy
          1. 5.4.1.2.1. Communication Plan
        3. 5.4.1.3. Scheduling Reporting
          1. 5.4.1.3.1. Schedule Basis Document Report
          2. 5.4.1.3.2. Schedule Review Report
        4. 5.4.1.4. Schedule Status Reports
        5. 5.4.1.5. Historical Performance/Trend Reports
        6. 5.4.1.6. Float Dissipation Reports
        7. 5.4.1.7. CPI/SPI Metrics Report
      2. 5.4.2. Earned Value Measurement Forecasting
      3. 5.4.3. Risk Analysis Forecasting
      4. 5.4.4. Written Narratives
      5. 5.4.5. Reporting Frequency.
    5. 5.5. Float Management
    6. 5.6. Recovery Scheduling (Accounting for Delay)
    7. 5.7. Change Management
      1. 5.7.1. Scope Change—Identification and Documentation
      2. 5.7.2. Delays—Identification and Documentation
        1. 5.7.2.1. Prospective Time Impact Analysis
        2. 5.7.2.2. Claims Avoidance and Monitoring
  12. Section 6—Appendix
    1. 6.1. References
    2. 6.2. Index
    3. 6.3. Glossary of Terms
    4. 6.4. Leadership Team Members
    5. 6.5. Topic Writers and Contributors
    6. 6.6. Smooth Project Contributors
    7. 6.7. Acknowledgements