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Crossing Platforms A Macintosh/Windows Phrasebook by David Pogue, Adam Engst

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Chapter 10. J

Java

In Windows: Java

Java is a cross-platform programming language developed by Sun Microsystems. It’s used primarily on the Internet for small programs, called applets, that can be downloaded and run from web pages.

On Windows, you don’t need to think much about Java. When you encounter a Java applet on a web page, it should download and run automatically, requiring no input from you—and often more smoothly than it would on the Macintosh.

JPEG

In Windows: JPEG

JPEG, which stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group, is a graphics compression format that’s commonly applied to photographic images. Almost every photograph you find on the World Wide Web, for example, is stored in JPEG format (and bears the suffix .jpg or .jpeg on its name). In Windows, you can open JPEG files with any web browser.

JPEG files are 100 percent cross-platform—you can easily transfer JPEG files between Macintosh and Windows machines with no conversion. Remember, however, to add the suffix .jpg to any Macintosh JPEG file you intend to transfer to a Windows machine. If you don’t, double-clicking the file may not open it correctly.

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