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Crossing Platforms A Macintosh/Windows Phrasebook by David Pogue, Adam Engst

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Chapter 46. V

Video Connector

On the Macintosh: Monitor Port

PCs generally have only a standard 15-pin video connector these days, but in the more controlled world of the Macintosh, there are in fact four different video connectors (usually referred to as monitor ports) in use.

“Standard” Apple monitor port. The most common, though recently discontinued, monitor port, found on pre-1999 Power Macintosh models, among others, is a 15-pin port with two rows of pins (see Figure 46-1), as opposed to the three rows in the standard VGA connector. To connect a multisync monitor to this port, you need an adapter. These adapters are usually available from the company that makes the monitor, often for free, and you can buy more full-featured adapters that provide switches for different resolutions and other settings. Be careful with the free adapters—some-times they restrict you to specific resolutions.

Standard VGA 15-pin monitor port. In a welcome move toward standardizing with the PC world, current Power Macs and the PowerBook G3 Series use the same 3-row 15-pin VGA-style video connector to which you’re accustomed on the PC (see Figure 46-2). Ironically, these PowerBooks come with an adapter as well, in case you want to connect a Macintosh-specific monitor with the 2-row 15-pin connector.

Standard Apple monitor port
Figure 46-1. Standard Apple monitor port
Figure 46-2. Standard VGA 15-pin monitor port

VID-14 PowerBook monitor ...

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