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Data Model Patterns: A Metadata Map

Book Description

Data Model Patterns: A Metadata Map not only presents a conceptual model of a metadata repository but also demonstrates a true enterprise data model of the information technology industry itself. It provides a step-by-step description of the model and is organized so that different readers can benefit from different parts.

It offers a view of the world being addressed by all the techniques, methods, and tools of the information processing industry (for example, object-oriented design, CASE, business process re-engineering, etc.) and presents several concepts that need to be addressed by such tools.

This book is pertinent, with companies and government agencies realizing that the data they use represent a significant corporate resource recognize the need to integrate data that has traditionally only been available from disparate sources. An important component of this integration is management of the "metadata" that describe, catalogue, and provide access to the various forms of underlying business data. The "metadata repository" is essential to keep track of the various physical components of these systems and their semantics.

The book is ideal for data management professionals, data modeling and design professionals, and data warehouse and database repository designers.

  • A comprehensive work based on the Zachman Framework for information architecture—encompassing the Business Owner's, Architect's, and Designer's views, for all columns (data, activities, locations, people, timing, and motivation)
  • Provides a step-by-step description of model and is organized so that different readers can benefit from different parts
  • Provides a view of the world being addressed by all the techniques, methods and tools of the information processing industry (for example, object-oriented design, CASE, business process re-engineering, etc.)
  • Presents many concepts that are not currently being addressed by such tools — and should be

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Data Management Systems: Series Editor: Jim Gray, Microsoft Research
  5. Copyright
  6. Dedication
  7. Dedication
  8. PREFACE
  9. FOREWORD
  10. Chapter 1: ABOUT METADATA MODELS
    1. WHAT ARE METADATA?*
    2. IN SEARCH OF METADATA
    3. THE ARCHITECTURE FRAMEWORK*
    4. METAMODELS AND THE FRAMEWORK
    5. THE NOTATION: OBJECT AND ENTITY CLASSES
    6. LEVEL OF ABSTRACTION
  11. Chapter 2: DATA
    1. DATA AND THE ARCHITECTURE FRAMEWORK
    2. THE BUSINESS OWNER AND BUSINESS RULES
    3. ROW TWO: BUSINESS TERMS, CONCEPTS, AND FACT TYPES
    4. ROW THREE: THE ENTITY-RELATIONSHIP DIAGRAM
    5. ROW FOUR: DATA DESIGN
    6. ROW SIX: THE PRODUCTION SYSTEM
  12. Chapter 3: ACTIVITIES, FUNCTIONS, AND PROCESSES
    1. ACTIVITIES AND THE ARCHITECTURE FRAMEWORK
    2. DEFINITIONS
    3. TYPES OF PROCESS MODELS
    4. ROW TWO: FUNCTIONS AND BUSINESS PROCESSES
    5. ROW THREE: PROCESSING DATA
    6. ROW FOUR: PROGRAM MODULES
    7. ROW SIX: PROGRAM INVENTORY*
  13. Chapter 4: LOCATIONS
    1. ABOUT LOCATIONS
    2. ROW TWO: PLACING PARTIES, BUSINESS PROCESSES, AND MOTIVATION
    3. ROW THREE: DATA FLOW DIAGRAMS
    4. ROW FOUR: PLACING DATA AND PROGRAMS
    5. ROW SIX: SYSTEM INVENTORY
  14. Chapter 5: PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS
    1. THE PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS COLUMN
    2. ABOUT PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS
    3. ROW TWO: THE BUSINESS OWNER’S VIEW
    4. ROW THREE: THE ARCHITECT’S VIEW
    5. ROW FOUR: THE DESIGNER’S VIEW
    6. ROW SIX: SECURITY AND GOVERNANCE
  15. Chapter 6: EVENTS AND TIMING
    1. THE EVENTS AND TIMING COLUMN
    2. ROW TWO: BUSINESS EVENT TYPES
    3. ROW THREE: SYSTEM EVENTS
    4. ROW FOUR: PROGRAM EVENTS
  16. Chapter 7: MOTIVATION
    1. THE MOTIVATION COLUMN
    2. ROW THREE: THE ARCHITECT’S VIEW
    3. ROW FOUR: THE DESIGNER’S VIEW
    4. ROW SIX: MEASURING DATA QUALITY
  17. GLOSSARY
  18. REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING
  19. ABOUT THE AUTHOR
  20. INDEX