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Data Modeling for the Business: A Handbook for Aligning the Business with IT using High-Level Data Models by Chris Bradley, Donna Burbank, Steve Hoberman

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Remember that even after the model is complete, there is still a maintenance task that we must stay on top of. The HDM will not change often, but it will change. We need to have formal processes for keeping the model up-to-date and aligned with the other model levels. We also want to make sure that the HDM is actively used by other groups and processes in the organization and doesn’t become a passive artifact.

What works well is to have two additional steps in any software methodology:

1. Borrowing from a HDM, and

2. Contributing back to the HDM.

The first step takes place after the HDM is complete. For example, before starting a logical data model, one will need to reference the HDM and most likely use the HDM as a starting ...

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