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Designing a UX Portfolio by Ian Fenn

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8 Completing the picture

”In anything at all, perfection is finally attained not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away”1 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

The vast majority of UX portfolios that I’ve reviewed contain only an introduction and a collection of case studies. That’s all. It’s a good start, but adding additional information that supports and reinforces your qualifications can positively set you aside from competitors.

Process

I often see portfolios with a section dedicated to process. It is often unnecessary — the case studies typically convey the designer’s process. There is usually no need for a dedicated section.

There are some circumstances where it would be worth adding. The first is when non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) limit what you can write. The other is when the process used in your case studies don’t match what you believe the hiring manager will want. For example, if your previous work indicates a ‘waterfall’ process and you know the client runs ‘lean UX.’ If you are confident that you could work as the prospective employer requires — and only if this is the case — adopt the process as your own and describe it as your preferred option.

In both situations, describe each step in the process and why it is important. Include extracts from sample (or obfuscated) documents where you feel these would add color.

If your preferred design process is based on a known model, provide the creator with credit. However, avoid ...

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