Chapter 9. Traditional Project Management

Don't fall victim to forcing round projects into square project holes. You are only courting failure. If your project isn't well-served by your methodology, find and use a methodology that does fit the project.

Robert K. Wysocki, Ph.D., President, Enterprise Information Insights, Inc.

CHAPTER LEARNING OBJECTIVES

After reading this chapter, you will be able to:

  • Appreciate and understand the history of traditional project management (TPM)

  • Know when to use TPM

  • Use and adapt the Linear project management life cycle (PMLC) model

  • Explain the benefits and use of the Rapid Linear PMLC model

  • Explain the benefits and use of the Feature-Driven Development (FDD) model

  • Anticipate and resolve the potential problems from using a Rapid Linear PMLC model

  • Explain the benefits of using an Incremental PMLC model

  • Anticipate and resolve the potential problems of using an Incremental PMLC model

In this chapter, you will learn at a very detailed level the kinds of projects that lend themselves to TPM approaches. These are the approaches that satisfy the management needs of projects whose goal and solution are clearly and completely documented. There are two different models in the traditional category — Linear and Incremental — and one variation within the Linear PMLC models — the Rapid Linear PMLC model.

What Is Traditional Project Management?

TPM is firmly rooted in the 1950s and has been around longer than any other approach to project management. In fact, I don't recall ...

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