Engineers for Korea

Book description


“The engineer is bearer of the nation’s industrialization,” says the tower pictured on the front cover. President Park Chung-hee (1917-1979) was seeking to scale up a unified national identity through industrialization, with engineers as iconic leaders. But Park encountered huge obstacles in what he called the “second economy” of mental nationalism. Technical workers had long been subordinate to classically-trained scholar officials. Even as the country became an industrial powerhouse, the makers of engineers never found approaches to techno-national formation—engineering education and training—that Koreans would wholly embrace.

This book follows the fraught attempts of engineers to identify with Korea as a whole. It is for engineers, both Korean and non-Korean, who seek to become better critical analysts of their own expertise, identities, and commitments. It is for non-engineers who encounter or are affected by Korean engineers and engineering, and want to understand and engage them. It is for researchers who serve as critical participants in the making of engineers and puzzle over the contents and effects of techno-national formation.

Table of contents

  1. Preface and Acknowledgments (1/2)
  2. Preface and Acknowledgments (2/2)
  3. What Are Korean Engineers For? (1/2)
  4. What Are Korean Engineers For? (2/2)
    1. What is a Korean Engineer? (1/2)
    2. What is a Korean Engineer? (2/2)
    3. Government Struggles to Establish Sovereignty
    4. Koreas and Engineers
    5. References
  5. Five Koreas Without Korean Engineers: 1876–1960
    1. Late Joseon Disinterest in Physical Labor: 1876–1897
    2. Responding to the Threat from Japan: 1897–1910
    3. Low-Level Technicians for the Japanese Empire: 1910–1945 (1/2)
    4. Low-Level Technicians for the Japanese Empire: 1910–1945 (2/2)
    5. No Place for Engineers in an Agrarian Vision: 1945–1948
    6. Rebuilding Again Without Engineers: 1948–1960 (1/2)
    7. Rebuilding Again Without Engineers: 1948–1960 (2/2)
      1. A Matter of Individual Interest and Ambition
    8. References
  6. Technical Workers for Light Industry: 1961–1970
    1. A Program in Two Parts
    2. Technical Soldiers for Industrial Development
      1. Initial Attempts to Scale Up Technical Education
      2. Higher-Level Experts for Exports
    3. Resistance in the “Second Economy” (1/2)
    4. Resistance in the “Second Economy” (2/2)
    5. References
  7. Engineers for Heavy and Chemical Industries: 1970–1979
    1. Making Heavy Industry Korean (1/2)
    2. Making Heavy Industry Korean (2/2)
    3. Vocational Graduates for Specific Industries
    4. Rational Scientist-Engineers for Leadership
    5. Korean Miracle? Continuing Struggles in the Second Economy
    6. References
  8. Loss of Privilege and Visibility: 1980–1998
    1. Rationalizing the Economy (1/2)
    2. Rationalizing the Economy (2/2)
    3. Engineers Lose the Spotlight: 1980s
    4. Coordinated Creativity? (1/2)
    5. Coordinated Creativity? (2/2)
    6. Competitive Self-Development or an Organized Profession? 1990s (1/2)
    7. Competitive Self-Development or an Organized Profession? 1990s (2/2)
    8. References
  9. Engineers for a Post-Catch-Up Korea?
    1. Scaling Up an Image of Crisis
    2. Uneven Support from Successive Governments
    3. The Continuing Struggles of Women Engineers
    4. Military Practice and the Dominant Image of Engineering
    5. New Images Scaling Up?
    6. References
  10. Engineers and Korea
    1. Korean Engineers and the Scholar-Official (1/2)
    2. Korean Engineers and the Scholar-Official (2/2)
    3. Critical Self-Reflection and Critical Participation
    4. References
  11. Index (1/3)
  12. Index (2/3)
  13. Index (3/3)
  14. Author Biographies
  15. Table 1.1: Classifications of technical workers by the Economic Planning Board. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gwahakgisul Yeongam (Science and Technology Annals) (1/2)
  16. Table 1.1: Classifications of technical workers by the Economic Planning Board. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gwahakgisul Yeongam (Science and Technology Annals) (2/2)
  17. Table 1.2: Classifications of technical workers by the Ministry of Science and Technology and 1973 Qualification Act. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gwahakgisul Yeongam (Science and Technology Annals) (1/2)
  18. Table 1.2: Classifications of technical workers by the Ministry of Science and Technology and 1973 Qualification Act. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gwahakgisul Yeongam (Science and Technology Annals) (2/2)
  19. Table 1.3: Classifications of research workers by the Ministry of Science and Technology. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gwahakgisul Yeongam (Science and Technology Annals) (1/2)
  20. Table 1.3: Classifications of research workers by the Ministry of Science and Technology. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gwahakgisul Yeongam (Science and Technology Annals) (2/2)
  21. Table 1.4: Gender composition of engineering graduates, 1980–2005. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gyoyuk Tonggye Yeonbo (Statistical Yearbook of Education) (1/2)
  22. Table 1.4: Gender composition of engineering graduates, 1980–2005. Source: Ministry of Science and Technology, Gyoyuk Tonggye Yeonbo (Statistical Yearbook of Education) (2/2)
  23. Table 1.5: Numbers of researchers in five countries28
  24. Table 3.1: Fields of study for Rhee and Park administrators. Source: Han Seung-jo 1975:77
  25. Table 5.1: Number of employees by industry, 1965–1995 (1/2)
  26. Table 5.1: Number of employees by industry, 1965–1995 (2/2)
  27. Table 5.2: Suicide rates in Korea during the 1990s. Source: www.kostat.go.kr (Statistics Korea) (1/2)
  28. Table 5.2: Suicide rates in Korea during the 1990s. Source: www.kostat.go.kr (Statistics Korea) (2/2)

Product information

  • Title: Engineers for Korea
  • Author(s): Kyonghee Han, Gary Downey
  • Release date: April 2013
  • Publisher(s): Morgan & Claypool Publishers
  • ISBN: 9781627050777