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Environment Modeling-Based Requirements Engineering for Software Intensive Systems

Book Description

Environment Modeling-Based Requirements Engineering for Software Intensive Systems provides a new and promising approach for engineering the requirements of software-intensive systems, presenting a systematic, promising approach to identifying, clarifying, modeling, deriving, and validating the requirements of software-intensive systems from well-modeled environment simulations. In addition, the book presents a new view of software capability, i.e. the effect-based software capability in terms of environment modeling.

  • Provides novel and systematic methodologies for engineering the requirements of software-intensive systems
  • Describes ontologies and easily-understandable notations for modeling software-intensive systems
  • Analyzes the functional and non-functional requirements based on the properties of the software surroundings
  • Provides an essential, practical guide and formalization tools for the task of identifying the requirements of software-intensive systems
  • Gives system analysts and requirements engineers insight into how to recognize and structure the problems of developing software-intensive systems

Table of Contents

  1. Cover image
  2. Title page
  3. Table of Contents
  4. Copyright
  5. About the Author
  6. Preface
  7. Acknowledgments
  8. Part 1. Background
    1. Introduction
    2. Chapter 1. Requirements and Requirements Engineering
      1. 1.1. Requirements
      2. 1.2. Requirements Engineering
      3. 1.3. Three Dimensions of Requirements Engineering
    3. Chapter 2. Requirements Engineering Methodologies
      1. 2.1. Metaphor: “To-Be System Is for Automatically Measuring and Controlling the Reality”
      2. 2.2. Metaphor: “To-Be System Is for Fulfilling Real-World Goals That Stakeholders Want to Achieve”
      3. 2.3. Metaphor: “To-Be System Is for Improving the Dependencies Among Intentional Actors”
      4. 2.4. Metaphor: “To-Be System Is for Enhancing the As-Is System Usage Experience”
      5. 2.5. Metaphor: “To-Be System Is for Establishing Relationships Among Phenomena of Reality”
      6. 2.6. Summary
    4. Chapter 3. Importance of Interactive Environment
      1. 3.1. Software-Intensive Systems
      2. 3.2. Challenges to Requirements Engineering
      3. 3.3. Environment, Requirements, and Specification
    5. Part One References
  9. Part 2. Ontology and System-Interactive Environment Ontology
    1. Introduction
    2. Chapter 4. Ontology-Oriented Interactive Environment Modeling
      1. 4.1. Ontology and Ontologies
      2. 4.2. Types of Ontologies
      3. 4.3. Ontology-Oriented Domain Modeling
      4. 4.4. Top-Level Environment Ontology
      5. 4.5. Domain Environment Ontology
    3. Chapter 5. Domain Environment Ontology Construction
      1. 5.1. Domain Environment Modeling via Knowledge Engineering
      2. 5.2. Domain Environment Ontology Construction
      3. 5.3. Automatic Domain Environment Ontology Construction
      4. 5.4. Another Example of Domain Environment Ontology
      5. 5.5. Summary
    4. Chapter 6. Feature Model of Domain Environment
      1. 6.1. Feature Model and Feature Configuration
      2. 6.2. Environment Feature Model
      3. 6.3. Goal Feature Model
      4. 6.4. Summary
    5. Part Two References
  10. Part 3. Environment Modeling-Based System Capability
    1. Introduction
    2. Chapter 7. Effect-Oriented System Capability
      1. 7.1. Capability Specification of Semantic Web Services
      2. 7.2. Effect-Based Capability Model
      3. 7.3. System Capability Profile
      4. 7.4. Summary
    3. Chapter 8. Reasoning I: System Capability Comparison and Composition
      1. 8.1. Related Work in Service-Oriented Computing
      2. 8.2. Environment Modeling-Based Capability Comparison
      3. 8.3. Environment Modeling-Based Capability Composition
      4. 8.4. Summary
    4. Chapter 9. Reasoning II: System Capability Refinement
      1. 9.1. Guided Process for Scenario Description
      2. 9.2. Scenario-Based Capability Projection
      3. 9.3. Summary
    5. Chapter 10. Reasoning III: System Capability Aggregation
      1. 10.1. Principles and Architecture
      2. 10.2. Requirements-Driven Agent Aggregation
      3. 10.3. Capability Assignment Problem
      4. 10.4. Summary
    6. Part Three References
  11. Part 4. Environment-Related Nonfunctionalities
    1. Introduction
    2. Chapter 11. The System Dependability Problem
      1. 11.1. Background and Principles
      2. 11.2. Cybernetics and Model of Dependable Systems
      3. 11.3. Function and Control Capability Profile Cluster Requirements Elicitation and Modeling
      4. 11.4. Summary
    3. Chapter 12. The System Dynamic Adaptability Concern
      1. 12.1. Dynamic Adaptation Mechanisms
      2. 12.2. Modeling Dynamic Adaptation Capability
      3. 12.3. Expression of Conformance-Based Dynamical Adaptation
      4. 12.4. Summary
    4. Chapter 13. Other Nonfunctionality Patterns
      1. 13.1. Introduction
      2. 13.2. Problem-Oriented Nonfunctional Requirement Patterns and Their Concerns
      3. 13.3. A Case Study
      4. 13.4. Discussion
    5. Part Four References
  12. Index