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Essential ActionScript 3.0 by Colin Moock

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Flash Client Runtime Environments

ActionScript programs can be executed by three different software applications (all produced by Adobe): Flash Player, Adobe AIR, and Flash Lite.

Flash Player executes ActionScript programs in a web browser or in a standalone mode on the desktop. Flash Player has very little access to the operating system (e.g., it cannot manage files, control windows, or access most hardware).

Adobe AIR executes ActionScript programs on the desktop and has full integration with the desktop operating system (e.g., can manage files, control windows, and access hardware).

Flash Lite executes ActionScript programs on mobile devices, such as cellular phones. As of the publication of this book, Flash Lite can execute ActionScript programs written in ActionScript 2.0, but not ActionScript 3.0, while Flash Player and Adobe AIR can execute programs written in ActionScript 3.0. Therefore, the techniques taught in this book apply to Flash Player and Adobe AIR, but will not apply to Flash Lite until it adds support for ActionScript 3.0.

In generic terms, Flash Player, Adobe AIR, and Flash Lite are all known as Flash client runtime environments (or Flash runtimes for short) because they manage ActionScript programs while they execute, or "run." Flash runtimes are available for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux, as well as a variety of different mobile hardware devices. Because ActionScript programs are executed by a Flash runtime, not a specific operating system or hardware device, each ActionScript program is considered portable because it can run on different hardware devices (phones, game consoles) and operating systems (Windows, Macintosh, and Linux).

In casual discussion, the term ActionScript virtual machine is sometimes used as an equivalent for Flash client runtime environment. There is, however, a difference between these two terms, so they should not be used interchangeably. The ActionScript virtual machine (AVM) is technically the software module inside Flash Player, Adobe AIR, and Flash Lite that executes ActionScript programs. But each Flash runtime also has other responsibilities, such as displaying content on screen, playing video and audio, and communicating with the operating system. The specific version of the ActionScript virtual machine that runs ActionScript 3.0 code is known as AVM2. The specific version of the ActionScript virtual machine that executes ActionScript 1.0 and ActionScript 2.0 code (not covered in this book) is known as AVM1.

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