(Ray)
(05-12427) Job:05-12424 Title:RP-Field Guide-How to be a Fashion Designer
#175 Dtp:221 Page:60
054-089_12427.indd 60054-089_12427.indd 60 5/30/09 9:16:19 AM5/30/09 9:16:19 AM
60
|
FIELD GUIDE: HOW TO BE A FASHION DESIGNER
ure that even today is still used as a
reference for defining a collection.
The silhouette, being the first impres-
sion one has of a garment, dictates
the general spirit of the collection
from the get-go. For this reason, it will
serve as a guide in the making of each
of the garments and will determine,
among other details, the volumes,
the proportions, and materials—for
example, a geometric silhouette will
need a more rigid fabric than a free-
flowing silhouette.
The standard term used for defining
silhouettes is the line, articulated by
the cut, the placement of pleats,
and the effect these create. There
are various kinds of lines: the A line,
which refers to a garment that is
narrow in the upper part with a low
waist that widens toward the lower
extreme; the trapezoid line, recog-
nized by its broad backs and non-
round forms that extend to the lower
border of the garment; and the Y line,
characterized by very wide shoulders
with narrow skirts or straight pants, to
name a few.
To preserve coherency and order in a
collection, it is important to maintain
common lines or details that recur
throughout the pieces.
COLOR
Color is fundamental to the concep-
tion of a collection. It is one of the fac-
tors that first draws the attention of
consumers, conveying the spirit and
emotions that the collection wishes
to express: sensuality, mystery, inno-
cence, maturity, madness, etc. Such
(Ray) Text
(05-12427) Job:05-12424 Title:RP-Field Guide-How to be a Fashion Designer
#175 Dtp:221 Page:60
054-089_12427.indd 60054-089_12427.indd 60 5/30/09 9:16:19 AM5/30/09 9:16:19 AM
D
esigner
Page:60
(Ray)
(05-12427) Job:05-12424 Title:RP-Field Guide-How to be a Fashion Designer
#175 Dtp:221 Page:61
054-089_12427.indd 61054-089_12427.indd 61 5/30/09 9:16:32 AM5/30/09 9:16:32 AM
DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
|
61
is its importance that over the his-
tory of contemporary fashion, there
have been designers associated with
a particular color to the extent that
it identifies them, resulting in a sym-
biosis where one cannot exist without
the other, such as the case of Lanvin
blue, Valentino red, or the shocking
pink of Elsa Schiaparelli.
In order to create a color menu (a
selection of between four and ten
tones to be used in the production
of a collection, some more frequently
as base colors, others exclusively for
details) it is important to keep in mind
the three dimensions of a color if one
wishes to obtain a chromatically har-
monious color menu in which nothing
is too shrill:
Color: the color itself, such as red,
blue or yellow.
Value: the degree of luminosity or
darkness a color has. The highest or
most luminous values of a color are
its hues and the lowest or darkest
are its shadows.
Saturation: the degree of intensity
of a color, the brightness or pale-
ness that it emits depending on
its level of purity; when it is pure,
and neither black nor white or any
other color has been added to it,
the color is at its maximum level of
saturation.
Playing with colors and their dimen-
sions in various ways produces differ-
ent harmonic ranges:
Monochromatic range: the selec-
tion of a single color; varying its
saturation and/or value produces
different shades.
D
esigner
Page:60
(Ray) Text
(05-12427) Job:05-12424 Title:RP-Field Guide-How to be a Fashion Designer
#175 Dtp:221 Page:61
054-089_12427.indd 61054-089_12427.indd 61 5/30/09 9:16:32 AM5/30/09 9:16:32 AM

Get Field Guide: How to be a Fashion Designer now with O’Reilly online learning.

O’Reilly members experience live online training, plus books, videos, and digital content from 200+ publishers.