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From Additive Manufacturing to 3D/4D Printing 2

Book Description

Additive manufacturing, which was first invented in France and then applied in the United States, is now 33 years old and represents a market of around 5 billion euros per year, with annual growth of between 20 and 30%. Today, additive manufacturing is experiencing a great amount of innovation in its processes, software, engineering and materials used. Its strength as a process has more recently allowed for the exploration of new niches, ranging from applications at nanometer and decameter scales, to others in mechanics and health.   As a result, the limitations of the process have also begun to emerge, which include the quality of the tools, their cost of manufacture, the multi-material aspects, functionalities and surface conditions.

Volume 2 of this series presents the current techniques, improvements and limits of additive manufacturing, providing an up-to-date review of this process.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. Dedication
  3. Title
  4. Copyright
  5. Acknowledgments
  6. Foreword
  7. Preface
  8. Introduction
    1. I.1. Introduction
    2. I.2. Bibliography
  9. PART 1: Incremental Innovations and Technologies Pushed to their Limits
    1. 1 Incremental Developments of Processes, Machines and Materials
      1. 1.1. Introduction
      2. 1.2. Undertaking non-layered stereolithography
      3. 1.3. Challenging the notion of layers
      4. 1.4. Optical-quality surface finish
      5. 1.5. Cold-cast metal 3D printing
      6. 1.6. Colored objects
      7. 1.7. Conclusion
      8. 1.8. Bibliography
  10. PART 2: Additive Manufacturing Pushed to its Limits
    1. Introduction to Part 2
      1. I.1. Introduction
      2. I.2. Overall framework
      3. I.3. Bibliography
    2. 2 μ-Fluidics (or Microfluidics)
      1. 2.1. Introduction
      2. 2.2. Review of microfluidics
      3. 2.3. Applications
      4. 2.4. Return to additive manufacturing
      5. 2.5. Conclusive outcomes
      6. 2.6. The converse problem: a potential μ-fluidics application to additive manufacturing
      7. 2.7. Provisional concept
      8. 2.8. Conclusion
      9. 2.9. Bibliography
    3. 3 3D Nanomanufacturing, 3D μ-Electronics and μ-Robotics
      1. 3.1. Introduction
      2. 3.2. 3D nano-facturing
      3. 3.3. 3D μ-electronics
      4. 3.4. Actuators and μ-robots
      5. 3.5. Conclusion
      6. 3.6. Bibliography
  11. PART 3: How Should We Go That One Step Further?
    1. 4 A Short Reflection on Spheres to Explore Their Conditions for Achieving Success
      1. 4.1. Introduction
      2. 4.2. Favored spheres of innovation
      3. 4.3. Some conditions to ensure additive manufacturing reaches maturity?
      4. 4.4. A positive conclusion
      5. 4.5. Bibliography
    2. 5 Questions of Hope and “Unhope”
      1. 5.1. Introduction
      2. 5.2. The “lab-tribe” (LT) approach
      3. 5.3. Creativity’s place in research
      4. 5.4. Innovation, a consequence of creativity
      5. 5.5. What solutions to evoke for additive manufacturing?
      6. 5.6. In the form of a conclusion: a summary of the author’s point of view
      7. 5.7. Bibliography
  12. Conclusion
  13. Index
  14. End User License Agreement