Getting Started with Docker Enterprise Edition on IBM Z

Book Description

Abstract

What is the difference between a virtual machine and a Docker container?

A virtual machine (VM) is like a house. It is fully contained with its own plumbing and heating and cooling system. If you want another house, you build a new foundation, with new walls, new plumbing, and its own heating and cooling system. VMs are large. They start their own operating systems.

Containers are like apartments in an apartment building. They share infrastructure. They can be many different sizes. You can have different sizes depending on the needs. Containers “live” in a Docker host.

If you build a house, you need many resources. If you build an apartment building, each unit shares resources. Like an apartment, Docker is smaller and satisfies specific needs, is more agile, and more easily changed.

This IBM® Redbooks® publication examines the installation and operation of Docker Enterprise Edition on the IBM Z® platform.

Table of Contents

  1. Front cover
  2. Notices
    1. Trademarks
  3. Preface
    1. Authors
    2. Now you can become a published author, too!
    3. Comments welcome
    4. Stay connected to IBM Redbooks
  4. Chapter 1. Introduction
    1. 1.1 Why Docker on IBM Z
      1. 1.1.1 IBM Z
      2. 1.1.2 Linux ONE
      3. 1.1.3 Open Source and LinuxONE
    2. 1.2 Understanding the concepts of Docker EE on IBM Z
    3. 1.3 Docker overview
    4. 1.4 Security
      1. 1.4.1 Pervasive encryption
      2. 1.4.2 Linux encryption
      3. 1.4.3 Secure Service Containers
  5. Chapter 2. Planning for Docker Enterprise Edition
    1. 2.1 Sample of Scenarios for containers on Linux on z
      1. 2.1.1 Scenario 1: All elements are running in the same subsystem
      2. 2.1.2 Scenario 2: Same LPAR with different hosts running Docker
      3. 2.1.3 Scenario 3: Dockers hosts are running on different LPARs and servers
    2. 2.2 Hardware and software prerequisites on IBM Z
      1. 2.2.1 Requirements for installing Docker on IBM Z
    3. 2.3 Lab resources and configuration
    4. 2.4 z/VM and SSI considerations
      1. 2.4.1 High availability and Docker
    5. 2.5 Docker editions
    6. 2.6 Container orchestration
      1. 2.6.1 Kubernetes
      2. 2.6.2 Swarm
  6. Chapter 3. Installing and deploying Docker
    1. 3.1 Installing Docker
      1. 3.1.1 SuSE Linux
      2. 3.1.2 Red Hat Linux
      3. 3.1.3 Ubuntu Linux
    2. 3.2 Docker storage
    3. 3.3 Docker verification
    4. 3.4 Using hardware crypto for application containers
    5. 3.5 Moving Docker hosts by using z/VM SSI feature
    6. 3.6 Setting up swarm mode
    7. 3.7 Setting up Kubernetes
    8. 3.8 Kubernetes versus Docker Swarm
      1. 3.8.1 Kubernetes
      2. 3.8.2 Docker Swarm
  7. Chapter 4. Basic Docker operations
    1. 4.1 Linux on Z commands
      1. 4.1.1 Overview
    2. 4.2 Basic Docker commands
      1. 4.2.1 Docker info
      2. 4.2.2 Docker ps
      3. 4.2.3 Docker rmi
      4. 4.2.4 Docker rm
      5. 4.2.5 Docker stop
      6. 4.2.6 Docker pull
      7. 4.2.7 Docker tag
      8. 4.2.8 Docker build
      9. 4.2.9 Docker run
      10. 4.2.10 Docker container port
      11. 4.2.11 Docker exec
      12. 4.2.12 Docker attach
      13. 4.2.13 Docker stop
      14. 4.2.14 Docker kill
      15. 4.2.15 Docker logs
      16. 4.2.16 Docker diff
      17. 4.2.17 Docker image
      18. 4.2.18 Docker network
      19. 4.2.19 Docker commit
      20. 4.2.20 Docker inspect
    3. 4.3 Swarm commands
      1. 4.3.1 Get information about your cluster
      2. 4.3.2 List nodes in swarm
      3. 4.3.3 Demote a node
      4. 4.3.4 Promote a node
      5. 4.3.5 Changing the availability of your nodes
      6. 4.3.6 Find worker join command
      7. 4.3.7 Find manager join command
      8. 4.3.8 Leave a swarm
    4. 4.4 Kubernetes commands
      1. 4.4.1 Getting the status of the cluster
    5. 4.5 Backing up a container
  8. Chapter 5. Sample use cases
    1. 5.1 Database management systems
      1. 5.1.1 MongoDB
      2. 5.1.2 IBM Db2 database
    2. 5.2 IBM Watson Explorer Analytical Components
      1. 5.2.1 Preparing the image
      2. 5.2.2 Installing Watson Explorer AC
    3. 5.3 Docker in swarm mode
      1. 5.3.1 Removing node from swarm
      2. 5.3.2 Opening firewall ports on manager and worker nodes
      3. 5.3.3 Updating /etc/hosts file
      4. 5.3.4 Initializing swarm mode
      5. 5.3.5 Adding node manager to the cluster
      6. 5.3.6 Adding worker nodes to the manager node
      7. 5.3.7 Creating a Docker service
      8. 5.3.8 Scaling a container up
      9. 5.3.9 Changing node availability to simulate a schedule maintenance
      10. 5.3.10 Promoting a worker node
      11. 5.3.11 Demoting a manager node
      12. 5.3.12 Running manager-only nodes
      13. 5.3.13 Scaling down a service
      14. 5.3.14 Considerations regarding the number of manager nodes
    4. 5.4 Kubernetes
      1. 5.4.1 Adding a worker node to a Kubernetes cluster
      2. 5.4.2 Pause (cordon off) a worker node
      3. 5.4.3 Temporarily remove a worker node for maintenance
      4. 5.4.4 Removing a worker node
    5. 5.5 Web services
    6. 5.6 Tying it all together
      1. 5.6.1 Connecting to the Db2 container
      2. 5.6.2 Creating a collection
      3. 5.6.3 Configuring a Db2 crawler
      4. 5.6.4 Mining the contents
  9. Back cover

Product Information

  • Title: Getting Started with Docker Enterprise Edition on IBM Z
  • Author(s): Eduardo Simoes Franco Lydia Parziale Robert Green, Eric Everson Mendes Marins, Mariana Roveri, Nilton Carlos Dos Santos
  • Release date: March 2019
  • Publisher(s): IBM Redbooks
  • ISBN: 9780738457505