O'Reilly logo

HTML5 Multimedia Development Cookbook by Lee Jordan, Dale Cruse

Stay ahead with the world's most comprehensive technology and business learning platform.

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required

Displaying alternate content for non-supported browsers

Some of the new HTML5 elements are so new that not all desktop browsers support them yet. So how can we assume all screen readers will support them?

Getting ready

Fortunately we can rest assured that screen readers will support common text tags such as:

  • <h1>
  • <h2>
  • <h3>
  • <h4>
  • <h5>
  • <h6>
  • <p>
  • <ul>
  • <ol>
  • <li>
  • <dl>
  • <dt>
  • <dd>

and more as intended. But what about those new HTML5 elements such as:

  • <article>
  • <aside>
  • <audio>
  • <canvas>
  • <datalist>
  • <details>
  • <figcaption>
  • <figure>
  • <footer>
  • <header>
  • <hgroup>
  • <mark>
  • <meter>
  • <nav>
  • <output>
  • <progress>
  • <section>
  • <summary>
  • <time>
  • <video>

Are those going to convey the meaning to the user as we intend? If so, terrific. But if not, what information does the user get? Is it meaningful at all? Certainly ...

With Safari, you learn the way you learn best. Get unlimited access to videos, live online training, learning paths, books, interactive tutorials, and more.

Start Free Trial

No credit card required