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Inside Windows® Server 2003 by William Boswell

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Recovering Failed Fault Tolerant Disks

If you have your data on a single drive or a non-fault tolerant volume such as a spanned volume or a striped volume, you expect to lose data if a drive fails. Because disk failure is an unavoidable fact of computer life, I assume that you have a good backup system and a plan for restoring data quickly. If a single disk in a striped volume fails, for example, you must delete the volume from the remaining disks, replace the disk, and rebuild the volume.

On the other hand, if you don't want to deal with masses of panicked users and their crazed managers who will gather outside the server room like enraged French revolutionaries looking for guillotine fodder, you'll want to put your data on a fault tolerant ...

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