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INSPIRED, 2nd Edition by Marty Cagan

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Discovery Testing Techniques

Overview

In product discovery, we're essentially trying to quickly separate the good ideas from the bad as we work to try to solve the business problems assigned to us. But what does that really mean?

We think of four types of questions we're trying to answer during discovery:

  1. Will the user or customer choose to use or buy this? (Value)
  2. Can the user figure out how to use this? (Usability)
  3. Can we build this? (Feasibility)
  4. Is this solution viable for our business? (Business viability)

Remember that for many of the things we work on, most or all of these questions are very straightforward and low risk. Your team is confident. They have been there and done this many times before, and so we will proceed to delivery.

The main activity of discovery is when these answers are not so clear.

There is no prescribed order to answering these questions. However, many teams follow a certain logic.

First, we will usually assess value. This is often the toughest—and most important—question to answer, and if the value isn't there, not much else matters. We likely will need to address usability before the user or customer can even recognize the value. In either case, we usually assess usability and value with the same users and customers at the same time.

Once we have something that our customers believe ...

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