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Inspired Leadership by Kevin Gaskell

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Chapter 4Make the Impossible Possible

Figure depicting the term “COMMIT” that includes three parts: 1. A team can achieve amazing things; 2. Your team has untapped potential; and 3. Shared commitment will make change happen. First two parts indicating the term “DARE TO DREAM” by changing the definition of success by creating an inspiring vision. Second part also indicating the term “BUILD BELIEF” by changing 3% into 30% by inspiring your team to dream. Last two parts indicating the term “HOW GOOD DO YOU WANT TO BE” by turning around negativity by exciting and involving unfulfilled team members. Last part (3) also indicating the term “MAKE THE IMPOSSIBLE POSSIBLE” by creating a powerful shared process by using discipline and team work.

I believe many limitations that people think they face in life are self-imposed. But how do you break through those limitations?

So far, we have discussed how to dream, and how to connect that dream to the aspirations of your team. But to many of them, especially if the business has struggled, those dreams will seem impossible.

In this chapter, I'm taking apart one of my charity walks to show that something that seemed impossible at first sight wasn't, and that teamwork, at its best, can achieve remarkable, apparently impossible, success. Another quote from Muhammad Ali sums it up: “Impossible is not a fact. It's an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It's a dare. Impossible is potential.”

Realizing that potential, however, does not happen by chance.

Walking to the North Pole

I walked to the North Pole because my sister died of cancer in 2004.

Jayne was 44 years old. After she died, I asked the consultant who had treated her for myeloid leukaemia for five years whether anything would have helped, or if there was a tool that the hospital didn't have that it needed.

“We could do with a monoclonal antibody unit,” she said. I asked her to explain, and she told me it was a hospital ward where they treat patients in a specific way, using particular antibodies. I asked why they didn't have one, and then she told me the price of building ...

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